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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 97 97 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 17 17 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 2 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 2nd, 1861 AD or search for August 2nd, 1861 AD in all documents.

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number that I saw in various parts of the field, and allowing a wide margin for those unobserved, I should think that the killed and wounded on our side did not exceed from 800 to 1,000. The impossibility of making a careful survey of the field after the battle had ceased, must be my apology for the briefness and want of detail in this report. W. S. King, Sur. and Med. Diree'r, U. S. A. Capt. J. B. Fry, Asst. Adjt.-Gen., U. S. A. Subsistence Department report. Arlington, Va., Aug. 2, 1861. Captain: For the information of the general commanding the Department, I have the honor to submit the following report in reference to the subsistence of the army under his command during its recent operations in front. On the 15th ult., the commanders of divisions were directed to see that all the troops of their respective commands have cooked and in their haversacks by 3 P. M. if. the next day three days rations; and orders were given that five days additional subsistence should
Doc. 154.-the fight at Dug Springs, Mo. August 2, 1861. A correspondent at Curran, Stone County, Missouri, gives the following account of this affair:--The report which reached us at Springfield, gave rise to the belief that Gen. McCulloch designed an attack upon that point, by two columns moving from Cassville and Sarcoxie. The Federal scouts reported their force at about fifteen thousand in each division, and on Wednesday they were reported within twenty miles of the town and advancing from Cassville. On the 1st instant Gen. Lyon ordered his entire command, with the exception of a small guard, to rendezvous at Crane Creek, ten miles south of Springfield. The command consisted as follows. The exact strength of the different corps I am not at liberty to give, for obvious military precaution: Five companies First and Second Regiment Regulars, Major Sturgis. Five companies First Regiment Missouri Volunteers, Lieutenant-Col. Andrews. Two companies Second Regiment Missouri Vo
Doc. 155.-Gen. Butler's Temperance order. General order, no. 22.Headquarters, Department Virginia, Fort Monroe, Va., August 2, 1861. The General commanding was informed on the first day of the month, from the books of an unlicensed liquordealer near this post, and by the effect on the officers and soldiers under his command, that use of intoxicating liquors prevailed to an alarming extent among the officers of his command. He had already taken measures to prevent its use among the men, but had presumed that officers and gentlemen might be trusted; but he finds that, as a rule, in some regiments that assumption is ill founded, while there are many honorable exceptions to this unhappy state of facts; yet, for the good of all, some stringent measures upon the subject are necessary. Hereafter, all packages brought into this department for any officer, of whatever grade, will be subjected to the most rigid inspection, and all spirituous and intoxicating liquors therein will