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Doc 163. Claiborne Jackson's Declaration of the Independence of the State of Missouri. August 5, 1861. In the exercise of the right reserved to the people of Missouri by the treaty under which the United States acquired the temporary dominion of the country west of the Mississippi River, in trust for the several sovereign States afterward to be formed out of it, that people did, on the twelfth day of June, one thousand eight hundred and twenty, mutually agree to form and establish a free and independent republic by the name of the State of Missouri. On the tenth day of August, eighteen hundred and twenty-one, the State was duly admitted into the Union of the United States of America, under the compact called the Constitution of the United States, and on equal footing with the original States in all respects whatever. The freedom, independence, and sovereignty of Missouri, and her equality with the other States of the Union, were thus guaranteed not only by that Constitution
Doc. 166.-battle at Athens, Mo. Fought August 5, 1861. A correspondent of the Chicago Tribune in a letter from Warsaw, Ill., gives the following details of this skirmish: Warsaw, Ill., Aug. 9, 1861. The telegraph has informed you of the battle at Athens, Mo., on the 5th inst., and I now propose to detail the events which preceded and accompanied it. For the past three or four weeks the northeast corner of Missouri has been in a state of anarchy. There has been no security for life and property, and no effort made to enforce the laws and to restore order. This state of things originated from the attempts of secessionists to drive Union men out of the country. To effect this, they did not use actual force; but they collected in squads, visited the houses of Unionists — mostly in the absence of the men — insulted and abused the women, and threatened that unless the family left the men would be shot or hung. Union men and their families were thus kept in a state of co