Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 6th, 1861 AD or search for August 6th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Doc. 159.-confiscation act. Approved August 6, 1861. an act to confiscate property used for insurrectionary purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That if, during the present or any future insurrection against the Government of the United States, after the President of the United States shall have declared, by proclamation, that the laws of the United States are opposed and the execution thereof obstructed by combinations too powerful to be suppressed by the ordinary course of judicial proceedings, or by the power vested in the marshals by law, any person or persons, his, her, or their agent, attorney, or employee, shall purchase or acquire, sell or give, any property of whatsoever kind or description, with intent to use or employ the same, or suffer the same to be used or employed, in aiding, abetting, or promoting such insurrection or resistance to the laws, or any person or persons engaged th
Doc. 164.-skirmish near point of Rocks, Md. Berlin, Md., August 6, 1861. Messrs. Editors: You will please announce in your morning paper that a sharp skirmish took place this morning opposite the Point of Rocks, in Virginia. A detachment of sixty men of the Twenty-eighth regiment of New York Volunteers, stationed at our place, under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel Brown, crossed the river at this place last night and marched through the county, and came on a party of cavalry of Captain Mead's company, of the Confederate army, opposite the Point of Rocks. The Colonel, with his party, came on them about sunrise, and ordered them to halt, which was not obeyed, and they fired on them and killed three, wounded two, and took twenty horses, with their equipments, and seven prisoners. They brought them into camp this morning about ten o'clock, without getting a man hurt. Among the killed is George Orrison, of Loudon County. Among the prisoners are a son of Mrs. Dawson, one M
ed, it is obvious that the rights dependent upon the execution of these laws must temporarily fail, and it is equally obvious that the rights dependent on the laws of the States within which military operations are conducted must necessarily be subordinate to the military exigencies created by the insurrection, if not wholly forfeited by the treasonable conduct of the parties claiming them. To this the general rule of the right to service forms an exception. The act of Congress approved Aug. 6, 1861, declares that if persons held to service shall be employed in hostility to the United States, the right to their services shall be discharged therefrom. It follows of necessity that no claim can be recognized by the military authority of the Union to the services of such persons When fugitives. A more difficult question is presented in respect to persons escaping from the service of loyal masters. It is quite apparent that the laws of the State under which only the services of such