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been taken possession of, and these were all the hospital accommodations to be found at the end of the first three months. So general was the opinion that the war would be speedily ended no one thought of such a thing as building permanent structures for hospital purposes. But this condition of affairs soon after changed. Preparations for war were made on a grander scale. The Army of the Potomac, under the moulding hands of McClellan, was assuming form, and the appointment by him, Aug. 12, 1861, of Surgeon Charles S. Tripler as medical director of that army indicated a purpose of having a medical department set on foot and put in completeness for active service. Let us pause and glance at the situation as he found it, and we may, perhaps, the better appreciate the full magnitude of the task which he had before him. Army Regulations were the written law to which it was attempted to have everything conform as far as possible. But when these regulations were drafted, there w
health; E. P. and E. M. are at Long branch (Mr. H. N's) on a visit to a young friend. J. P. has just called, having resigned his commission in the United States Navy, and received one in the Confederate; he is on his way to Richmond for orders. He tells me that my dear W. B. P. has come in from Kentucky, with the first Kentucky Regiment, which is stationed near Centreville. It is right he should come; and I am glad he has, though it is another source of painful anxiety to me. August 12th, 1861. Still nothing from the army. We go on here quietly and happily — as happily as the state of the country will allow. The household peaceful and pleasant. The ladies-all of us collect in one room-work, while one reads some pleasant book. We are mercifully dealt with, and I hope we are grateful for such blessings. The Northern papers tell us that General Patterson has withdrawn from the Northern army. The reason thereof is not mentioned; but we shrewdly suspect that the power
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 2: civil and military operations in Missouri. (search)
a gathering storm and the intense darkness, McCulloch countermanded the order, and his army, wearied with waiting and watching, was still in camp on Wilson's Creek on the morning of the 10th. Report of General Price to Governor Jackson, August 12th, 1861. Pollard, in his First Year of the War, page 187, says, that after receiving orders to march, on the evening of the 9th, the troops made preparation, and got up a dance before their camp-fires. This dance was kept up until a late hour. Thously said to a National officer, who was with a party at his quarters, under a flag of truce, Your loss was very great, but ours was four times yours. See Report of the Committee on the Conduct of the War. General Price, in his report (August 12th, 1861), says the loss of his command was nearly 700, or nearly one-fifth of his entire force. The shattered National, troops were in no condition to follow up the advantage which they had gained in the closing contest. Their strength and their a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
s at Columbus in peril, 88. Zollicoffer's advance in Kentucky the Unionists aroused battle among the Rock Castle Hills, 89. battle of Piketon, 90 Theeast Tennessee Unionists disappointed the Confederate foothold in Tennessee and Kentucky, 91. Contrary to general expectation, the Confederates did not pursue the shattered little army that was led by Sigel, from Springfield to Rolla. See page 54. McCulloch contented himself with issuing a proclamation to the people of Missouri, Aug. 12, 1861. telling them that he had come, on the invitation of their Governor, to assist in driving the National forces out of the State, and in restoring to the people their just rights. He assured them that he had driven the enemy from among them, and that the Union troops were then in full flight, after defeat. He called upon the people to act promptly in co-operation with him, saying, Missouri must be allowed to choose her own destiny--no oaths binding your consciences. This was all that th
st Iowa Volunteers121384   Total,223721292 Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operency's obedient servant, sterling Price, Major-General, Commanding Missouri State Guard, J. B. Clark's report Headquarters, Third District M. S. G., August 12, 1861. Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price, Commanding Missouri State Guard:-- General: I have the honor to submit to you the following detailed report of the part taken byla. Benj. McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's report. Headquarters McCulloch's brigade, camp Weightman, near Springfield, Mo., August 12, 1861. Brigadier-General J. Cooper, Adjutant-General, C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to make the following official report of the battle of the Oak Hills on
Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operations of the army under my command, at and immedency's obedient servant, sterling Price, Major-General, Commanding Missouri State Guard, J. B. Clark's report Headquarters, Third District M. S. G., August 12, 1861. Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price, Commanding Missouri State Guard:-- General: I have the honor to submit to you the following detailed report of the part taken byla. Benj. McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's report. Headquarters McCulloch's brigade, camp Weightman, near Springfield, Mo., August 12, 1861. Brigadier-General J. Cooper, Adjutant-General, C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to make the following official report of the battle of the Oak Hills on
Doc. 179.-the release of the surgeons. August 12, 1861. The following is a copy of the parole signed by the surgeons who were permitted to leave Richmond: The undersigned officers in the service of the United States do make an unqualified parole of honor that we will not, unless released or exchanged, by arms, information or otherwise, during the existing hostilities between the United States and the Confederate States of America, aid or abet the enemies of the said Confederate States, or any of them, in any form or manner whatever. [Signed by five.] This is endorsed on the back by Gen. Beauregard as follows: Headquarters First corps, army of the Potomac, Aug. 3. The parole of these surgeons was taken to prevent the necessity of guarding them while they were attending to the enemy's wounded, with the understanding that it was to be continued by the War Department after leaving here, and that they were to be permitted to return to their homes when their service
Doc. 180.-proclamation of Ben. McCulloch. Headquarters Western army, camp near Spingfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. To the People of Missouri:-- Having been called by the Governor of your State to assist in driving the National forces out of the State, and in restoring the people to their just rights, I have come among you simply with the view of making war upon our Northern foes, to drive them back, and give the oppressed of your State an opportunity of again standing up as freemen, and of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shoulder
Doc. 37.-the battle of Manassas. [correction of official Reports.] headquarters Department N. E. V., Arlington, August 13, 1861. Colonel Richardson, commanding Fourth Brigade: Sir: I herewith enclose you an extract from a supplemental report of Brigadier-General McDowell, of the battle of Bull Run, on the twenty-first ultimo. I am, Sir, very respectfully, Your most obedient servant, Chauncy McKeever, Asst. Adj.-General. headquarters Department N. E. V., Arlington, August 12, 1861. Lieutenant-Colonel E. D. Townsend, A. A. G., Headquarters of the Army: Colonel: My attention has been called by those interested, to two omissions in my report of the battle of the twenty-first ultimo, near Manassas, and I ask leave to make the following corrections, wishing that they be made part of my original report. In speaking of the retreat, I mentioned that it was covered by Colonel Blenker's brigade. I should have said Colonel Richardson's and Colonel Blenker's brigades. The
allantry, and devotion displayed by the officers of both corps of engineers under the most trying circumstances. During the Maryland campaign I united the two corps under Capt. J. C. Duane, U. S. Engineers, and found great advantages from the arrangement. The permanent union of the two corps, since made, was no doubt a wise measure. Surgeon Charles S. Tripler and Surgeon Jonathan Letterman in turn performed the duties of medical director of the Army of the Potomac, the former from Aug. 12, 1861, until July 1, 1862, and the latter after that date. The difficulties to be overcome in organizing and making effective the medical Department were very great, arising principally from the inexperience of the regimental medical officers, many of whom were physicians taken suddenly from civil life, who, according to Surgeon Tripler, had to be instructed in their duties from the very alphabet, and from the ignorance of the line officers as to their relations with the medical officers, whi
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