Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 12th, 1861 AD or search for August 12th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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st Iowa Volunteers121384   Total,223721292 Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operency's obedient servant, sterling Price, Major-General, Commanding Missouri State Guard, J. B. Clark's report Headquarters, Third District M. S. G., August 12, 1861. Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price, Commanding Missouri State Guard:-- General: I have the honor to submit to you the following detailed report of the part taken byla. Benj. McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's report. Headquarters McCulloch's brigade, camp Weightman, near Springfield, Mo., August 12, 1861. Brigadier-General J. Cooper, Adjutant-General, C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to make the following official report of the battle of the Oak Hills on
Secession official reports. General Price's report. Headquarters Missouri State Guard, Springfield, August 12, 1861. To His Excellency, Claiborne F. Jackson, Governor of the State of Missouri: I have the honor to submit to your Excellency the following report of the operations of the army under my command, at and immedency's obedient servant, sterling Price, Major-General, Commanding Missouri State Guard, J. B. Clark's report Headquarters, Third District M. S. G., August 12, 1861. Maj.-Gen. Sterling Price, Commanding Missouri State Guard:-- General: I have the honor to submit to you the following detailed report of the part taken byla. Benj. McCulloch, Brigadier-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's report. Headquarters McCulloch's brigade, camp Weightman, near Springfield, Mo., August 12, 1861. Brigadier-General J. Cooper, Adjutant-General, C. S. A.: General: I have the honor to make the following official report of the battle of the Oak Hills on
Doc. 179.-the release of the surgeons. August 12, 1861. The following is a copy of the parole signed by the surgeons who were permitted to leave Richmond: The undersigned officers in the service of the United States do make an unqualified parole of honor that we will not, unless released or exchanged, by arms, information or otherwise, during the existing hostilities between the United States and the Confederate States of America, aid or abet the enemies of the said Confederate States, or any of them, in any form or manner whatever. [Signed by five.] This is endorsed on the back by Gen. Beauregard as follows: Headquarters First corps, army of the Potomac, Aug. 3. The parole of these surgeons was taken to prevent the necessity of guarding them while they were attending to the enemy's wounded, with the understanding that it was to be continued by the War Department after leaving here, and that they were to be permitted to return to their homes when their service
Doc. 180.-proclamation of Ben. McCulloch. Headquarters Western army, camp near Spingfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. To the People of Missouri:-- Having been called by the Governor of your State to assist in driving the National forces out of the State, and in restoring the people to their just rights, I have come among you simply with the view of making war upon our Northern foes, to drive them back, and give the oppressed of your State an opportunity of again standing up as freemen, and of the State to act. You can no longer procrastinate. Missouri must now take her position, be it North or South. Ben. McCulloch, Brig.-General Commanding. Ben. McCulloch's order. Headquarters of Western army, near Springfield, Mo., Aug. 12, 1861. The General commanding takes great pleasure in announcing to the army under his command the signal victory it has just gained. Soldiers of Louisiana, of Arkansas, of Missouri, and of Texas, nobly have you sustained yourselves. Shoulder