hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 13 13 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 4 4 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for August 14th, 1861 AD or search for August 14th, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 183.-Major McKinstry's proclamation. (search)
lic peace and the public safety. Any violation of order will be followed by prompt and adequate punishment, regardless of persons or positions. J. Mckinstry, Major U. S. Army, Provost-Marshal. Office of the Provost-Marshal, St. Louis, Mo., August 14, 1861. Order no. 20. Office Provost-Marshal, Aug. 14, 1861. The wearing of concealed weapons by any persons not in the military service of the United States, or in the regularly constituted police force of the city, is hereby prohibited. Aug. 14, 1861. The wearing of concealed weapons by any persons not in the military service of the United States, or in the regularly constituted police force of the city, is hereby prohibited. No excuse of any kind or description will mitigate the severe punishment ordered to be inflicted for a violation of this order. J. McKinstry, Major U. S. Army, Provost-Marshal. Order no. 21. Office Provost-Marshal, St. Louis, August 14. Notice is hereby given to gunsmiths and dealers in firearms, resident in the city and county of St. Louis, that no description of firearms will be permitted to be sold or given away after this date, without a special permit from this office. J. Mokinstry
Doc. 184.-the revolt in the Seventy-Ninth N. Y. Regiment. August 14, 1861. The Washington correspondent of the Philadelphia Press, gives some details of the revolt in the Highland regiment. They were encamped on Meridian Hill, in the suburbs of Washington. I went out to the camp in the course of Wednesday, and found the men more like a mob than a regiment of soldiers. Many of them were intoxicated, having just been paid off, and those who had drank the most were the most turbulent and noisy. A large quantity of liquor had been surreptitiously introduced into the camp, and its use had gone far toward demoralizing the men. They had been ordered to march into Virginia in the morning, and had positively refused to obey. Colonel Stevens had been with them during the day, endeavoring to restore peace, but his exertions were of no avail. General Sickles was also present, for the same purpose. At one time a demonstration was made upon Gen. Sickles, but he coolly rode t
Doc. 185.-Bishop Whittingham's Pastoral letter. August 14, 1861. Beloved Brethren:--Eight months ago, at the call of the Chief Magistrate of the country then in office, I invited you to the earnest observance of a day set apart for united appeal, by public humiliation, fasting, and prayer, to the pardoning mercies of God in behalf of this sinful and chastised people. We have too much reason to fear that the humiliation of the nation at that time, however general and loud in professnately invite you; and implore you, not only in public assemblage on the day set apart for national observance, but also continually, in every mode of approach to God in prayer, before and after the set time of solemn service, to supplicate our Father in Heaven for the bestowal upon this people of his unspeakable blessing of godly quietness in public peace. Affectionately and faithfully, your servant in Christ, William Rollinson Whittingham, Bishop of Maryland. Baltimore, August 14, 1861.
Doc. 186.-Exchanges of prisoners — Retaliations. Rebel ideas on the subject, Aug. 14, 1861. It is stated in the journals of Lincolnism, at the North, that their Government will never recognize the Southern Confederacy, even for an exchange of prisoners. All who have not been officers of the United States army will be released on giving their parole not to bear arms against the United States, or afford aid or information to the enemy. A release on simple parole is, in military usage, a mitigation of the severities of imprisonment. A prisoner who claims his liberty accepts it on the condition that he will not take advantage of the indulgence in order to escape. He undertakes to render himself up whenever the captor thinks it expedient to commit him again into custody. In brief, he surrenders his privilege of escaping from prison, for the convenience of being at large, within the reach of his captors. Another sort of parole is that in which the captive is permitted to re