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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 19: events in the Mississippi Valley.--the Indians. (search)
ss still held out, but, finally yielding to the force of circumstances and the teachings of expediency, he called on the Council, of the Cherokee Nation to assemble at Tahlequah on the 20th of the same month, when he sent in a message, recommending the severance of their connection with the National Government, and an alliance with the Confederates. Four days afterward, August 24. he sent a note The following is a copy of Ross's note:-- Executive Department, Park Hill, C. N., August 24, 1861. To Major G. W. Clark, A. Q. M., C. S. A.: Sir:--I herewith forward to your care dispatches for General McCulloch, C. S. A., which I have the honor to request you will cause to be forwarded to him by earliest express. At a mass meeting of about four thousand Cherokees, at Tahlequah, on the 21st inst., the Cherokees, with marked unanimity, declared their allegiance to the Confederate States, and have given their authorities power to negotiate an alliance with them. In view of this a
ucky of the military force now organized and in camp within the State. If such action as is hereby urged be promptly taken, I firmly believe the peace of the people of Kentucky will be preserved, and the horrors of a bloody war will be averted from a people now peaceful and tranquil. B. Magoffin. The President, declining to receive Magoffin's Commissioners otherwise than as private citizens, returned this terse and pungent reply to their master's request: Washington, D. C., Aug. 24, 1861. To his Excellency, B. Magoffin, Governor of the State of Kentucky: Sir: Your letter of the 19th inst., in which you urge the removal from the limits of Kentucky of the military force now organized and in camp within that State, is received. I may not possess full and precisely accurate knowledge upon this subject; but I believe it is true that there is a military force in camp within Kentucky, acting by authority of the United States; which force is not very large, and is not now
Chaplin Hills, Ky.; Siege of Corinth, Miss.; Hoover's Gap, Tenn.; Sherman's March; Bentonville, N. C. notes.--Recruited at Toledo, in April, 1861, in response to the first call for troops, its first enlistment being for three months. It served its three months in West Virginia, during which it fought in some minor engagements. Upon its return to Toledo it reassembled after a short furlough and volunteered for three years, with but little change in the organization. Leaving Toledo, August 24, 1861, it proceeded to Kentucky, where it was assigned to Manson's Brigade, and was engaged for several months in the various movements against the Confederate forces. In March, 1862, it marched with Buell's army to reenforce Grant, but the Fourteenth did not arrive at Shiloh until the fighting was over. After participating in the Siege of Corinth, it marched with the Army of the Ohio on its arduous campaigns in Tennessee and Kentucky. At Perryville it was in Fry's Brigade of Schoepf's Div
Doc. 4. Gen. Wool's order. Headquarters, Department of Virginia, &c., Fortress Monroe, August 24, 1861. General Orders, No. 4: I. Many of the inhabitants of Elizabeth City and County complain of depredations having been committed on their property by soldiers stationed in their neighborhoods. All such persons, or others residing within the pale of this command, engaged in farming, cultivating their fields and gardens, tending their flocks or herds, or bringing provisions or supplies to the several camps or posts for the use of the troops, and pursuing peacefully their ordinary avocations, and who do not communicate directly or indirectly with the rebel forces, and who may comply with such orders as may be given them, will be protected in their persons and property. Any violation of this order by either officers or soldiers, or any parties interested, will be severely punished, and those who force a safeguard, on conviction before a court-martial, will be punished with dea
Doc. 5. letter from Gov. Thomas of Md. Ex-Governor Thomas, of Maryland, gives the following account of the attempt of the Maryland rebels upon his life: Cumberland, August 24, 1861. Dear sir: As an incident of to-day may be misrepresented, I will communicate to you the precise facts of the case. I left here this morning at half-past 6, for my home, in the railroad train. Ten miles from this place the cowcatcher of the engine ran against a pile of eight railroad ties, which had been carefully placed across the track. Fortunately six of the ties were scattered right and left of the road, and the train continued to run for about five hundred yards, when it was stopped by the resistance to its progress produced by the two remaining ties, which were so situated that one end rested on the engine and the other ploughed along the road. As soon as the cars halted, the engineer and fireman leaped off, and soon removed the two ties, while the baggage-master was out to see what
the people of Kentucky will be preserved, and the horrors of a bloody war will be averted from a people now peaceful and tranquil. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, B. Magoffin. Reply of the President. Washington, August 24, 1861. To his Excellency B. Magoffin, Governor of the State of Kentucky: sir: Your letter of the 19th instant, in which you urge the removal from the limits of Kentucky of the military force now organized and in camp, within that State, is receommunication intrusted to me. His response is embodied in a letter which I have the honor herewith to hand you. I am, sir, very respectfully your obedient servant, George W. Johnson. Commonwealth of Kentucky, Executive Dept., Frankfort, August 24, 1861. Hon. Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Va.: sir: Since the commencement of the unhappy difficulties pending in the country, the people of Kentucky have indicated a steadfast desire and purpose to maintain a position of strict neutrality between
Doc. 63 1/2. the Cherokee Indians. The Fort Scott Times published the following letter from John Ross, Chief of the Cherokee Indians, giving his adhesion to the Confederate States: Executive Department, Park Hill, Cherokee nation, August 24, 1861. To Major Clark, Ass't Quartermaster, C. S. A.: sir: I herewith forward to your care despatches for Gen. McCulloch, C. S. Army, which I have the honor to request you will cause to be forwarded to him by the earliest express. At a mass meeting of about four thousand Cherokees at Tahlegue on the 21st instant, the Cherokees, with marked unanimity, declared their adherence to the Confederate States, and have given their authorities power to negotiate an alliance with them. In view of this action, a regiment of mounted men will be immediately raised and placed under the command of Colonel John Drew, to meet any exigency that may arise. Having espoused the cause of the Confederate States, we hope to render efficient service
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, Chapter 8: from the battle of Bull Run to Paducah--Kentucky and Missouri. 1861-1862. (search)
uty with General Anderson. In this interview with Mr. Lincoln, I also explained to him my extreme desire to serve in a subordinate capacity, and in no event to be left in a superior command. He promised me this with promptness, making the jocular remark that his chief trouble was to find places for the too many generals who wanted to be at the head of affairs, to command armies, etc. The official order is dated-- [special order no. 114.] headquarters of the Army, Washington, August 24, 1861. The following assignment is made of the general officers of the volunteer service, whose appointment was announced in General Orders No. 62, from the War Department: To the Department of the Cumberland, Brigadier-General Robert Anderson commanding: Brigadier-General W. T. Sherman, Brigadier-General George H. Thomas. . . . . . . . . . By command of Lieutenant-General Scott: E. D. Townsend, Assistant Adjutant-General. After some days, I was relieved in command of my brig
acostia to the vicinity of Uniontown. On the 7th McCall received a battery of regular artillery; and on the 9th Kearny and Sherman each received another company of volunteer cavalry, and on the same day King's brigade of three regiments was formed, and posted on Meridian Hill. Three days afterwards it was increased by two regiments. On the 10th a battery was sent to Stone, and a second one to McCall, who received another regiment on the 12th. The formation of divisions was thus: Aug. 24, 1861: McDowell's division, consisting of Keyes's and Wadsworth's brigades. King's brigade was added on Oct. 5. About the same date--i.e., within two or three days after the formation of the Army of the Potomac--the troops under Gen. Banks were organized as a division. Aug. 28, 1861: Franklin's division, consisting of Kearny's and Franklin's old brigade. A third brigade added Sept. 4. Aug. 30, 1861: F. J. Porter's division, consisting of two brigades. A third brigade added Sept. 27
, I firmly believe the peace of the people of Kentucky will be preserved, and the horrors of a bloody war will be averted from a people now peaceful and tranquil. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, B. Magoffin. Washington, August 24, 1861. To his Excellency B. Magoffin, Governor of the State of Kentucky. sir: Your letter of the 19th instant, in which you urge the removal from the limits of Kentucky of the military force now organized and in camp within that State, is receit find, in your not very short letter, any declaration or intimation that you entertain any desire for the preservation of the Federal Union. Your obedient servant, A. Lincoln. Commonwealth of Kentucky, Executive Department, Frankfort, August 24, 1861. Hon. Jefferson Davis, Richmond, Virginia. sir: Since the commencement of the unhappy difficulties pending in the country, the people of Kentucky have indicated a steadfast desire and purpose to maintain a position of strict neutrality be
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