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A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 40 40 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 5 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 2, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
A. J. Bennett, private , First Massachusetts Light Battery, The story of the First Massachusetts Light Battery , attached to the Sixth Army Corps : glance at events in the armies of the Potomac and Shenandoah, from the summer of 1861 to the autumn of 1864. 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: September 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 2 2 Browse Search
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in, until there was a very large concourse assembled, when a meeting was organized, the Hon. John D. Townsend in the chair. The proceedings were opened by a patriotic address by Richard Busteed, followed by Daniel Northup, of Brooklyn, and resolutions indorsing the Administration in the prosecution of the war, were passed. An effigy of Jeff. Davis was produced and hung on a tree; afterward it was cut down and placed in a large coffin, bearing the inscription, Newtown secession, died August 29th, 1861. The remains were taken possession of by the Williamsburg delegation, who brought it home with them, and threw it in the river at the foot of Grand street. The proceedings, though not very orderly, were extremely enthusiastic and patriotic. Intelligence was received at Washington, from Independence, Mo., that the United States troops, seven hundred and fifty in number, who surrendered to three hundred Texan Rangers, eighteen miles from Fort Fillmore, had been released on parole,
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
h. The Harriet Lane and the transport Adelaide followed the Fanny in, and both grounded, This was an anxious moment for the Unionists, for, by these accidents, a valuable ship of war and a transport filled with troops were under the guns of the fort, and within the power of the Confederates. but they were finally hauled off. The forts were formally surrendered, under a capitulation signed by the respective commanders. The capitulation was signed on board the flag-ship Minnesota, August 29th, 1861, by S. H. Stringham, Flag Officer Atlantic Blockading Squadron, and Benjamin F. Butler, MajorGeneral U. S. Army, commanding, on one part, and S. Barron, Flag Officer C. S. Navy, commanding naval forces, Virginia and North Carolina, William F. Martin, Colonel Seventh Light Infantry, N. C. Volunteers, and W. S. G. Andrews, Major, commanding Forts Hatteras and Clark. It was agreed that commanders, men, forts, and munitions of war should be immediately surrendered to the Government of the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 5: capture of the works at Hatteras Inlet by Flag officer Stringham.--destruction of the privateer Judah. (search)
o had been left in command of Fort Hatteras after its capture, found his position to be an uncomfortable and dangerous one. The troops were subjected to annoying privations and dangerous exposure, and on one occasion narrowly escaped capture by the Confederates. On September 29th, 1861,Colonel Hawkins sent the 20th Indiana Regiment to take possession of and fortify Chicamacomico, the northern point of Hatteras Island. Plan of the attack on forts Hatteras and Clark, August 28th and 29th, 1861. These troops were but partially equipped and scantily provisioned, their supplies being sent the next day in the army transport Fanny. Just as this vessel arrived she was met by three Confederate steamers, but their true character was not known until they opened fire, and but few of the Fanny's crew escaped. As soon as the Confederates learned the true condition of affairs, they conceived the bold design not only of capturing the six hundred men of the Indiana regiment, but of ret
Butler convinces the Rebels that he is wanted there General order no. 28 execution of Mumford Farragut and Gen. Williams ascend the river to Vicksburg baffled there Breckinridge attacks Baton Rouge Williams killed Rebels repulsed ram Arkansas destroyed Weitzel reduces the Lafourche country Flanders and Hahn chosen to Congress Butler superseded by Banks Butler's parting address Jeff. Davis dissatisfied with his policy. Gen. Benjamin F. Butler, having, after the capture Aug. 29, 1861. See Vol. I., pp. 599-600. of Fort Hatteras, returned to the North to find himself an officer without soldiers or employment, sought and obtained permission from the War Department to raise, in the New England States, six regiments of volunteers for special and confidential service. This undertaking involved fitful collisions with the general efforts then being made by the authorities of all the States to raise troops for service under Gen. McClellan; and Gen. B. was peculiarly unfort
Present, also, at Liberty Gap; Chattanooga; Lovejoy's Station; Reynolds's Farm; Milledgeville; Savannah; Aiken; Bentonville; Raleigh; Morrisville. This regiment was organized as infantry, and it served as such at Shiloh and Stone's River; but, in April, 1863, the men were mounted, after which it served as mounted infantry until October, 1863, when it was officially designated the Eighth Indiana Cavalry, and two new companies — L and M — were added. It was organized at Indianapolis, August 29, 1861, and was immediately ordered into Kentucky, where it was subsequently assigned to Buell's Army, with which it marched to Shiloh. Under command of Lieutenant-Colonel Jones it fought with honorable distinction at Stone's River, sustaining there a loss of 30 killed, 119 wounded, and 231 captured or missing. The regiment reenlisted in February, 1864, and in April returned to Indiana on its veteran furlough. It rejoined Sherman's Army July 27th, in time to take an active part in the cavalr
t. Crosby on shore to demand the meaning of the white flag. The boat soon returned, bringing Mr. Weigel, with the following written communication from Samuel Barron, late captain in the United States Navy: Memorandum. Fort Hatteras, August 29, 1861. Flag officer Samuel Barron, C. S. Navy, offers to surrender Fort Hatteras, with all the arms and munitions of war. The officers allowed to go out with side arms, and the men without arms to retire. S. Barron, Commanding Naval Defence, Vcession reports. Major Andrews' report. on board United States ship Minnesota, September 1, 1861. To the Adjutant-General of North Carolina: sir: I beg leave to report that after a bombardment of three hours and twenty minutes, on August 29, 1861, I surrendered to Commodore S. H. Stringham, Flag-officer, and Major-General Benjamin F. Butler, Commanding United States forces, Fort Hatteras, at Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina. In making this report, I desire briefly to relate the circ
Secession reports. Major Andrews' report. on board United States ship Minnesota, September 1, 1861. To the Adjutant-General of North Carolina: sir: I beg leave to report that after a bombardment of three hours and twenty minutes, on August 29, 1861, I surrendered to Commodore S. H. Stringham, Flag-officer, and Major-General Benjamin F. Butler, Commanding United States forces, Fort Hatteras, at Hatteras Inlet, North Carolina. In making this report, I desire briefly to relate the circumstances attending the capitulation. I arrived at Fort Hatteras on the evening of the 28th of August in company with Commodore Barron, Flag-officer C. S. navy, in charge of the defences of Virginia and North Carolina, and found that during the day the enemy had attacked the forces under the command of Colonel William F. Martin, as well as Forts Clark and Hatteras, under my command, and after a day of most severe and unceasing fighting, the colonel had succeeded in concentrating all the f
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 6: contraband of War, Big Bethel and Hatteras. (search)
As the Fanny rounded in over the bar, the rebel steamer Winslow went up the channel having on board a large number of rebel troops, which she had not been able to land. We threw a shot at her from the Fanny, but she proved to be out of range. I then sent Lieutenant Crosby on shore to demand the meaning of the white flag which had been hoisted. The boat soon returned, bringing the following communication from Samuel Barron, late captain in the United States Navy:-- Fort Hatteras, August 29, 1861. Flag-Officer Samuel Barron, C. S. Navy, offers to surrender Fort Hatteras, with all the arms and munitions of war; the officers to be allowed to go out with side arms and the men without arms to retire. S. Barron, Commanding Naval Defences Virginia and North Carolina. A verbal communication also was sent by Barron stating that he had 615 men in the fort and one thousand more within an hour's call, but that he was anxious to spare the effusion of blood. To both the written an
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Engagements of the Civil War with losses on both sides December, 1860-August, 1862 (search)
Union, 5th Mo. Reserves. Losses: Union 1 killed, 7 wounded. August 19, 1861: Charleston or Bird's Point, Mo. Losses: Union 1 killed, 6 wounded. Confed. 40 killed. August 20, 1861: Hawk's Nest, W. Va. Losses: Union 3 wounded. Confed. 1 killed, 3 wounded. August 26, 1861: Cross Lanes or Summerville, W. Va. Losses: Union 5 killed, 40 wounded, 200 captured. August 27, 1861: ball's Cross Roads, Va. Losses: Union 1 killed, 2 wounded. August 28-29, 1861: Fort Hatteras, N. C. Union, 9th, 20th, and 89th N. Y. and Naval force. Confed. North Carolina troops under Col. W. F. Martin. Losses: Union 1 killed, 2 wounded. Confed. 5 killed, 51 wounded, 715 prisoners. August 31, 1861: Munson's Hill, Va. Losses: Union 2 killed, 2 wounded. September, 1861. September 1, 1861: Bennett's Mills, Mo. Losses: Union 1 killed, 8 wounded. September 2, 1861: Dallas, Mo. Losses: Union 2 killed. September 2, 1861: dr
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), Naval actions along the shore (search)
harged a gun at a floating foe until on July 28, 1861, the Confederate privateer Petrel, formerly the United States revenue cutter Aiken, was sunk by the sailing frigate St. Lawrence after receiving two shots broadside. Out of her crew of forty, thirty-six were rescued by the St. Lawrence's boats. To the Federal navy belongs the honor of achieving the first signal success along the coast, in the bombardment and capture of Forts Hatteras and Clark at Hatteras Inlet, on the 28th and 29th of August, 1861. From Hatteras Inlet offensive operations could be carried on by means of light-draft vessels along the entire coast of North Carolina. The inlet was the key to Albemarle Sound, and was, besides, a good depot for outfitting and coaling, and a refuge, owing to its sheltered position, from the fierce winter storms that raged along the shore. In the Gulf, there had been some skirmishing. The squadron under Captain John Pope that had been sent, after the escape of the Sumter to sea,
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