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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 260 260 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 18 18 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 11 11 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 6 6 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 4 4 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 4 4 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for October, 1861 AD or search for October, 1861 AD in all documents.

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the struggle then before us than was to be found among the so-called statesmen at Washington. Most wars in other nations have been the work of rulers or public men, who have drawn unwilling nations after them; but the American Civil War was at first, and remained for a long time, at the North, a war whose full importance was first recognized by the people, urging on a slow and reluctant government. General Sherman, in his Memoirs (I, 231), describes a conversation with Mr. Cameron in October, 1861, in which the former said: I asserted that there were plenty of men at the North ready and willing to come, if he would only accept their services; for it was notorious that regiments had been formed in all the north-western States, whose services had been refused by the War Department, on the ground that they would not be needed. . . . I thought I had roused Mr. Cameron to a realization of the great war that was before us and was in fact upon us. For regiments declined, see Schouler, I