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A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 21 21 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 5 5 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 10, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 2 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 15, 1861., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee. You can also browse the collection for October 7th, 1861 AD or search for October 7th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 6: the campaign in West Virginia. (search)
f men with typhoid fever and measles, the condition of the horses, of the artillery, and transportation, were such that Lee decided not to pursue. It is possible that had he known Rosecrans would not attack he would have given battle himself, notwithstanding the great advantage Rosecrans would have possessed by accepting it in his strong defensive position. The rapid approach of winter and the rainy season terminated the campaign in this section. In a letter dated Sewell Mountain, October 7, 1861, General Lee tells Mrs. Lee that at the time of the reception of her letter the enemy was threatening an attack, which was continued till Saturday night, when, under cover of darkness and our usual mountain mist, he suddenly withdrew. Your letter, with the socks, was handed to me when I was preparing to follow. I could not at the time attend to either, but I have since; and as I found Perry [his colored servant from Arlington] in desperate need, I bestowed a couple of pairs on him as