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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 2 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 2 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 2 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 2 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: October 24, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for October 20th, 1861 AD or search for October 20th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Army of the Potomac. [our own correspondent.] Dumfries, Oct. 20, 1861. The evening of Friday last found Centreville in such a condition that it was difficult to say whether one was himself or some other man. To collect our ideas a little, as well as to drive off dyspepsia and the gout, threatened by high life in camp, a trip to Manassas was decided upon. Saturday morning found us in a quiet country farm house, not far from the village. Standing beneath a trellis, over which sweet honeysuckles grow and shaded the porch, we waited patiently for "something to turn up" to give employment to two roving pens. Suddenly a dull, booming sound came to our ears from the direction of our batteries on the Potomac. "There's a gun," said my friend "Personne," who was quietly smoking his Havana; "and another, and another," as the reports reverberated through the air in quick succession. Every moment the firing increased, until the sounds run into each other, producing a continuous