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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 145 145 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for November, 1861 AD or search for November, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. Attempt to blockade the passes of the Mississippi. escape of the Sumter. the Manassas rams the Richmond. the battle at the pass. attempt to destroy the Vincennes. final results of the engagements. capture of the Royal Yacht in Galveston harbor by Lieut. James E. Jouett. attack on Fort McRae and Fort Pickens by the Niagara and Richmond, November 22, 1861. correct account of attempt to relieve Fort Sumter, April 12, 1861, and of relief of Fort Pickens, April 17, 1861. list of ships and officers of West Gulf Blockading Squadron, 1861. It would be a pleasant task to be able to record nothing but successes and have no defeats checked against us; but that could not very well be unless we admitted that our enemy was deficient in all the qualities which distinguish the American soldier and sailor, and that we gained our victories easily because we had no one of any courage,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 32: Navy Department.--energies displayed.--building of iron-clads (search)
tion could be built to cross the ocean and withstand the heaviest weather. Nine of the single-turreted Monitors were pushed to completion for the purpose of taking Charleston, and for such other work as could not be accomplished by wooden ships. From the time Rear-Admiral Dupont took command of the squadron, Charleston had been closely watched from outside the bar, and the whole southern coast blockaded to the satisfaction of the Department. This was good work to accomplish from November, 1861, to October, 1862, for it included, in addition to keeping up a vigorous blockade, a great many expeditions against the enemy in the numerous sounds and inlets; and these expeditions had often to be undertaken at the risk of neglecting the blockade for a day or two. The Navy Department had not yet been supplied with a sufficient number of vessels to comply with all the demands made upon it. There was a large amount of coast under blockade from the capes of Virginia to the Rio Grande i