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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 145 145 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 10 10 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 9 9 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 5 5 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for November, 1861 AD or search for November, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 15 results in 13 document sections:

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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Alabama. (search)
to Nov. 1841 Benj. FitzpatrickNov. 1841 to Nov. 1845 Joshua L. MartinNov. 1845 to Nov. 1847 Reuben ChapmanNov. 1847 to Nov. 1849 Henry Watkins CollierNov. 1849 to Nov. 1853 John A. WinstonNov. 1853 to Nov. 1857 Andrew B. MooreNov. 1857 to Nov. 1861 John Gill ShorterNov. 1861 to Nov. 1863 Thomas H. WattsNov. 1863 to Apr. 1865 Interregnum of two months. Lewis E. ParsonsJune. 1865 to Dec. 1865 Robt. M. PattonDec. 1865 to July, 1868 Wm. H. SmithJuly, 1868 to Nov. 1870 Robt. B. LindsayNov. 1861 to Nov. 1863 Thomas H. WattsNov. 1863 to Apr. 1865 Interregnum of two months. Lewis E. ParsonsJune. 1865 to Dec. 1865 Robt. M. PattonDec. 1865 to July, 1868 Wm. H. SmithJuly, 1868 to Nov. 1870 Robt. B. LindsayNov. 1870 to Nov. 1872 David B. LewisNov. 1872 to Nov. 1874 Geo. S. HoustonNov. 1874 to Nov. 1876 Geo. S. HoustonNov. 1876 to Nov. 1878 Rufus W. CobbNov. 1878 to Nov. 1880 Rufus W. CobbNov. 1880 to Nov. 1882 Edward N. O'NealNov. 1882 to Nov. 1884 Edward N. O'NealNov. 1884 to Nov. 1886 Thomas SeayNov. 1886 to Nov. 1888 Thomas SeayNov. 1888 to Nov. 1890 Thomas G. JonesNov. 1890 to Nov. 1892 Thomas G. JonesNov. 1892 to Nov. 1894 William C. OatesNov. 1894 to Nov. 1896 Joseph F. Johnsto
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Battles. (search)
Wilson's Creek (Mo.)Aug. 10, 1861 Hatteras Forts CapturedAug. 26-30, 1861 Carnifex Ferry (Va.)Sept. 10, 1861 Lexington (Mo.)Sept. 20, 1861 Santa Rosa IslandOct. 9, 1861 Ball's Bluff (Va.)Oct. 21, 1861 Port Royal Expedition (S. C.)Oct. to Nov., 1861 Belmont (Mo.)Nov. 7, 1861 Middle Creek (Ky.)Jan. 10, 1862 Fort Henry (Tenn.)Feb. 6, 1862 Roanoke Island (N. C.)Feb. 7 and 8, Fort DonelsonFeb. 16, 1862 Valvend (New Mexico)Feb. 21, 1862 Pea Ridge (Ark.)Mar. 7 and 8, Hampton Roads (Mon Wilson's Creek (Mo.)Aug. 10, 1861 Hatteras Forts CapturedAug. 26-30, 1861 Carnifex Ferry (Va.)Sept. 10, 1861 Lexington (Mo.)Sept. 20, 1861 Santa Rosa IslandOct. 9, 1861 Ball's Bluff (Va.)Oct. 21, 1861 Port Royal Expedition (S. C.)Oct. to Nov., 1861 Belmont (Mo.)Nov. 7, 1861 Middle Creek (Ky.)Jan. 10, 1862 Fort Henry (Tenn.)Feb. 6, 1862 Roanoke Island (N. C.)Feb. 7 and 8, Fort DonelsonFeb. 16, 1862 Valvend (New Mexico)Feb. 21, 1862 There has been, from colonial times, desultor
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Buford, John, 1825- (search)
Buford, John, 1825- Military officer; born in Kentucky in 1825; was graduated at West Point in 1848; became captain in 1859; and inspector-general, with the rank of major, November, 1861. He commanded a brigade of cavalry under General Hooker, and was so severely wounded near the Rappahannock (August, 1862) that he was reported dead. In the battle of Antietam he was on General McClellan's staff. He was conspicuous in many engagements while in command of the reserve cavalry brigade, and he began the battle of Gettysburg (q. v.). He was chief of Burnside's cavalry, and was assigned to the command of the Army of the Cumberland just before his death in Washington, D. C., Dec. 16, 1863.--His half-brother, Napoleon Bonaparte Buford (born in Woodford county, Ky., Jan. 13, 1807), was also graduated at West Point, and entered the artillery. He was a pupil in the Law School of Harvard University; Professor of Natural Philosophy at West Point; but retired to civil pursuits in 1835. Enga
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Davis, Jefferson, 1808-1889 (search)
-32, and resigned in 1835 to become a cotton-planter in Mississippi. He was a member of Congress in 1845-46, and served as colonel of a Mississippi regiment in the war with Mexico. He was United States Senator from 1847 to 1851, and from 1857 to 1861. He was called to the cabinet of President Pierce as Secretary of War in 1853, and remained four years. He resigned his seat in the Senate in January, 1861, and was chosen provisional President of the Southern Confederacy in February. In November, 1861, he was elected permanent President for six years. Early in April, 1865, he and his associates in the government fled from Richmond, first to Danville, Va., and then towards the Gulf of Mexico. He was arrested in Georgia, taken to Fort Monroe, and confined on a charge of treason for about two years, when he was released on bail, Horace Greeley's name heading the list of bondsmen for $100,000. He was never tried. He published The rise and fall of the Confederate government (1881). He di
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Georgia, (search)
ere seized on Jan. 3, 1861. On the same day the National arsenal at Savannah was taken possession of by Confederates, and 700 State troops, by the orders and in the presence of the governor, took possession of the arsenal at Augusta, Jan. 24, when the National troops there were sent to New York. In the arsenal were 22.000 muskets and rifles, some cannon, and a large amount of munitions of war. The forts were without garrisons, and each was in charge of only two or three men. Late in November, 1861, Commodore Dupont went down the coast from Port Royal with a part of his fleet, and with ease took possession of the Big Tybee Island, at the mouth of the Savannah River, from which Fort Pulaski, which was within easy mortar distance, might be assailed, and the harbor of Savannah perfectly sealed against blockade runners. On the approach of the National gunboats the defences were abandoned, and on Nov. 25, Dupont wrote to the Secretary of War: The flag of the United States is flying ov
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hamilton, Schuyler 1822- (search)
in New York City, July 25, 1822; graduated at West Point in 1841; served in the war with Mexico; and was acting aide to General Scott. He was severely wounded in a hand-to-hand engagement with Mexicans. He was bre vetted captain, and remained on Scott's staff until 1854. He left the army in 1855, but on the fall of Sumter (1861) he joined the 7th New York Regiment as a private. He became aide to General Butler at Annapolis, and soon entered the military family of General Scott at Washington. He was made brigadier-general in November, 1861, and accompanied General Halleck to Missouri, where he commanded the district of St. Louis. In February, 1862, he commanded a division of Pope's army; and by the planning and construction of a canal, greatly assisted in the capture of New Madrid and Island number ten (q. v.). In September, 1862, he was made major-general of volunteers. He resigned in February, 1863; and was hydrographic engineer for the New York department of docks in 1871-75.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), McClellan, George Brinton 1826-1885 (search)
ring and as superintendent of railroads. He was residing in Ohio when the Civil War broke out, and was commissioned major-general of Ohio volunteers by the governor. He took command of all the troops in the Department of the Ohio; and after a brief and successful campaign in western Virginia, was appointed to the command of the National troops on the Potomac (afterwards the Army of the Potomac) and commissioned a major-general of the regular army. On the retirement of General Scott in November, 1861, he was made generalin-chief. His campaign against Richmond in 1862 with the Army of the Potomac was not successful. He afterwards drove General Lee out of Maryland, but his delay in pursuing the Confederates caused him to be superseded in command by General Burnside. General McClellan was the unsuccessful Democratic candidate for President of the United States against Mr. Lincoln in 1864 (see below). He resigned his commission in the army on the day of the election, Nov. 8, and took u
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Pikeville, battle near (search)
Pikeville, battle near Gen. William Nelson was in command of about 3,000 loyalists in eastern Kentucky in November, 1861. About 1,000 Confederates, under Col. J. S. Williams, were at Pikeville, the capital of Pike county, Ky. Nelson sent Colonel Sill, with Ohio and Kentucky troops, to gain the rear of Williams, while, with the remainder, he should attack his front. A battalion of Kentucky volunteers, under Col. C. A. Marshall, moved in advance of Nelson. On the 9th these were attacked by Confederates in ambush, and a battle ensued, which lasted about an hour and a half, when the Confederates fled, leaving thirty of their number dead on the field. Nelson lost six killed and twenty-four wounded. He did not pursue, as he had no cavalry. Williams fled to the mountains at Pound Gap, carrying with him a large number of cattle and other spoils.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Schofield, John McAllister 1831- (search)
Schofield, John McAllister 1831- Military officer; born in Chautauqua county, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1831; graduated at West Point in 1853, where he was instructor in natural philosophy for five years. Under leave of absence he was filling a like post in the Washington University, Mo., when the Civil War broke out. He was chief of Lyon's staff at Wilson's Creek, and in November, 1861, was made brigadier-general of volunteers, commanding the Missouri militia. In April, 1862, he commanded the District of Missouri, and in October the Army of the Frontier, with which he drove the organized Confederate forces into Arkansas. In November, 1862, he was made major-general of volunteers. In the Atlanta campaign, in 1864, he was conspicuous; also in the campaign against Hood in Tennessee until the battle of Nashville, when he was transferred to North Carolina, taking possession of Wilmington, and was active until the surrender of Johnston. He was brevetted major-general, United States army, in
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Solid South, the (search)
their way. To remain was to acquiesce in the new order of things, or suffer intensely from social ostracism, if not from actual persecution. In east Tennessee, where the majority of the people were Unionists, fearful persecutions occurred at times. Unionists were imprisoned (see Brownlow, William Gannaway) and their property was plundered. Very soon the jails were filled with loyalists, and so completely were the people of that region under the control of armed Confederates that, in November, 1861, Col. W. B. Wood, a Methodist clergyman from Alabama, holding a Confederate military commission, wrote to Judah P. Benjamin, Secretary of War, at Richmond: The rebellion [resistance to Confederate rule] in east Tennessee has been put down in some of the counties, and will be effectually suppressed in less than two weeks. After speaking of breaking up the camps of the loyalists, he said, It is a farce to arrest them and turn them over to the courts.... They really deserve the gallows, an
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