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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 26 26 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 6 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 6 6 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 5 5 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for November 7th, 1861 AD or search for November 7th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 6: naval expedition against Port Royal and capture of that place. (search)
, and there was no harbor in the vicinity where a depot could be established for large vessels to carry on operations along the Southern coast. A depot was required for supplying coal, provisions and stores at a point where our ships could find safe anchorage at all times, and where machine shops and docks could be constructed for refitting vessels. The work of supplying vessels was one of vital importance, and a harbor was also Plan of the attack on forts Walker and Beauregard, November 7, 1861. needed as a base of operations against the whole Southern States. The choice of harbors lay between Bull's Bay, Port Royal, Brunswick and Fernandina. The latter, for some reasons, was considered an available place, but finally the Department concurred in the opinion of Flag Officer Dupont that Port Royal contained all the required advantages. Port Royal is one of the finest harbors in the United States, with water sufficient for the largest vessels. It is about equidistant betw
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
and these large sailing ships, though perfectly useless for blockading purposes, carried a large number of men who could at times be used with good effect in landing on the enemy's coast. Among the privateers which the Confederates were fitting out was one called the Royal Yacht, which was being prepared in Galveston harbor to be let loose on the Federal commerce. This fact was known to Captain Eagle, and he made preparations to destroy her before she could get to sea. On the 7th of November, 1861, an expedition was fitted out and placed under the command of Lieutenant James E. Jouett, with Lieutenant John J. Mitchell, Gunner William Carter and Master's Mate Chas. W. Adams in the first and second launches, each carrying a howitzer and a picked crew of men. At 11:40 P. M. the two boats entered the harbor unperceived, intending, if they could pass the armed schooner guarding the entrance and the Bolivar and Point forts, to try to surprise and burn the manof war steamer General