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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The capture of Mason and Slidell. (search)
The capture of Mason and Slidell. R. M. Hunter. On the 8th of November, 1861, the capture of John Slidell and J. M. Mason, the commissioners of the Southern Confederacy to England and France, was effected. It was the first considerable feat of the Federal navy, and, two weeks afterward, when the United States steamer San Jacinto landed her prisoners in Boston, the daring action of Captain Wilkes became the prevailing topic of the day, and superseded in interest the questions that grew ouht, and her identity was decided, there was no doubt of our mission. Then Captain Wilkes called Lieutenant Fairfax into the cabin, and gave him his instructions, of which the following is a copy: United States steamer San Jacinto, at sea, November 8th, 1861. Sir :--You will have the second and third cutters of this ship fully manned and armed, and be in all respects prepared to board the steamer Trent, now hove-to under our guns. On boarding her, you will demand the papers of the steame
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Captain Wilkes's seizure of Mason and Slidell. (search)
the commissioners, and I therefore ceased to discuss the affair. As the next in rank to Captain Wilkes, I claimed the right to board the mail-packet. Captain Wilkes fully expected that I would tender my services for this delicate duty, and rather left to me the plan of carrying out his instructions. Following is the text of Captain Wilkes's instructions, which, as will be seen from the narrative, were not literally observed by Lieutenant Fairfax: U. S. Steamer San Jacinto. At sea, Nov. 8th, 1861. sir: You will have the second and third cutters of this ship fully manned and armed, and be in all respects prepared to board the steamer Trent, now hove to under our guns. On boarding her you will demand the papers of the steamer, her clearance from Havana, with the list of passengers and crew. Should Mr. Mason, Mr. Slidell, Mr. Eustis, and Mr. McFarland be on board, you will make them prisoners and send t hem on board this ship immediately, and take possession of her as a pri
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 17: events in and near the National Capital. (search)
ices of incalculable value, which the General-in-chief afterward declared had been mainly instrumental in saving the Capital from seizure, and the Republic from ruin. Speech of General Scott before the Union Defense Committee of New York, November 8, 1861. See the published Reports, Resolutions, and Documents of that Committee. They heard the call of the President for seventy-five thousand men with profound satisfaction. On the same evening some gentlemen met at the house of an influential ies of our country. The Government had not the means of defending itself, when they were most needed. This Committee came forward and applied the remedy, and averted the danger. --Speech of General Scott before the Union Defense Committee, November 8, 1861. Before the close of the year 1861, one hundred and seven volunteer regiments had gone to the field from the State of New York, sixty-six of which were aided by the Union Defense Committee. Of these regiments, ninety were infantry, ten wer
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 3: military operations in Missouri and Kentucky. (search)
l H. W. Halleck was appointed to the command of the Missouri Department. On the morning of the 4th, Fremont and his Staff left the army for St. Louis. The parting with his devoted soldiers was very touching, and his reception in St. Louis Nov. 8 1861. was an ovation like that given to a victor. Crowds of citizens greeted him at the railway station and escorted him to his Headquarters. An immense torch-light procession passed through the streets that night in honor of his arrival; Thefire of three times their number for four hours.--Pollard's First Year of the War, 203. and Polk six hundred and thirty-two. Official reports of Grant and Polk, and their subordinate officers; private letter of General Grant to his father, Nov. 8th, 1861; Grant's Revised Report, June 26th, 1865; Pollard's First Year of the War. The latter gives the Confederate loss as it is above recorded. Ms. Reports of Acting Brigadier-General R. M. Russell, Nov. 9, and of Colonels E. Ricketts, Jr., and T.
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 5: military and naval operations on the coast of South Carolina.--military operations on the line of the Potomac River. (search)
was made to leak badly. Dupont reported it at thirty-one, of whom eight were killed. The Confederate officers reported their loss in both forts at fifty, of whom ten were killed in Fort Walker, but none in Fort Beauregard. On the evening succeeding the battle, a procession of seventeen boats, from the Wabash, conducted the remains of the dead to their burial-place on Hilton Head, near Pope's mansion, in a grove of palm and orange trees, not far from the fort; and on the following day, Nov. 8, 1861. Dupont issued a stirring general order, in which,. after speaking in praise of his officers and men, he said: The flag-officer fully sympathizes with the officers and men of the squadron, in the satisfaction they must feel at seeing the ensign of the. Union once more in the State of South Carolina, which has been the, chief promoter of the wicked and unprovoked rebellion they have been called upon to suppress. The flags captured at the forts were sent to the Navy Department, where they
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 7: the Trent affair. (search)
ly held this feeling in check until a favorable opportunity should occur, when, with some show of reason, it could assume an offensive attitude. With such opinions existing it would have been wiser for our Government in its then weak condition to have avoided anything that could in any way be considered unjustifiable, and to have endeavored as much as possible to prevent collisions of any kind with foreign powers, unless it was positively clear that we were in the right. On the 8th of November, 1861, an event occurred which created the wildest excitement throughout all parts of the United States and Great Britain; in fact, all Europe looked on with anxiety, anticipating a war between England and the Northern States of the Union. This excitement grew out of the arrest of the British mail steamer Trent on the high seas, by Captain Charles Wilkes, of the Captain Charles Wilkes. United States frigate San Jacinto, and taking from her four male passengers who claimed the protectio
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
c Report of Flag-officer Dupont:Flag-Ship Wabash, Off Hilton Head, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to inform you that yester day I attacked the enemy's batteries on e out. S. F. D. General order no. 2. Flag-Ship Wabash, Hilton Head, Port Royal Bay, Nov. 8, 1861. It is the grateful duty of the Commander-in-chief to make a public acknowledgment of his ort of Commander Charles Steedman. United States Steamer Bienville, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that in the action of yesterday with the forts this vessof Lieutenant-Commander T. H. Stevens. United States Gun-Boat Ottawa, Off Hilton Head, Nov. 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that, as soon as the Ottawa, under my command, could tak Report of Major John Geo. Reynolds, U. S. M. C. United States Ship Sabine, At Sea, November 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that the marine battalion under my command left Hampt
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
c Report of Flag-officer Dupont:Flag-Ship Wabash, Off Hilton Head, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to inform you that yester day I attacked the enemy's batteries on e out. S. F. D. General order no. 2. Flag-Ship Wabash, Hilton Head, Port Royal Bay, Nov. 8, 1861. It is the grateful duty of the Commander-in-chief to make a public acknowledgment of his ort of Commander Charles Steedman. United States Steamer Bienville, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that in the action of yesterday with the forts this vessof Lieutenant-Commander T. H. Stevens. United States Gun-Boat Ottawa, Off Hilton Head, Nov. 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that, as soon as the Ottawa, under my command, could tak Report of Major John Geo. Reynolds, U. S. M. C. United States Ship Sabine, At Sea, November 8, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to report that the marine battalion under my command left Hampt
Oaks, Va., Oct. 27, 1864 7 Cold Harbor, Va. (assault) 22 Spring Hill, Va., Dec. 10, 1864 5 Cold Harbor, Va. (trenches) 4 Fall of Petersburg, Va. 4 Picket, July 4, 1862 1 Rice's Station, Va. 2 Present, also, at Fort Pulaski; Arrowfield Church; Chester Station; Petersburg Mine; Appomattox. notes.--The regiment left the State Sept. 10, 1861, and in the following month sailed from Annapolis with General T. W. Sherman's expedition to Port Royal, S. C. Landing at Hilton Head, Nov. 8, 1861, it remained on duty in that Military Department over two years. During its stay there it took part in the reduction of Fort Pulaski, the occupation of Jacksonville, Fla., and was present at the bombardment.of Fort Sumter. Most of the time, however, was passed in garrison duty at Hilton Head, and Beaufort, S. C. In the meantime, the regiment received about 300 recruits and 200 conscripts, which kept its ranks up to the maximum, although the loss by disease had been very large. In March,
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
t. Headquarters of the Naval expedition, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 8, 1861. To the Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: sir: Squadron. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. The Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington: ske out. S. F. D. flag-ship Wabash, Hilton head, Port Royal Bay, Nov. 8, 1861. General order, No. 2.--It is the grateful duty of the Commankading Squadron. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal, Nov. 8, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles: sir: I have the honor to report the foll Report of Major Reynolds. U. S. Ship Sabine, at sea, November 8, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that the marine battalion Sherman, Brig.-Gon. Commanding. Headquarters, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 8, 1861. Accounts by officers engaged in the battle. The followinn the action: U. S. Steamer Pocahontas, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 8, 1861. We were to have left Hampton Roads on the 25th October, but
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