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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for November 8th, 1861 AD or search for November 8th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 36. battle of Port Royal, S. C. Fought November 7, 1861. (search)
t. Headquarters of the Naval expedition, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 8, 1861. To the Adjutant-General U. S. Army, Washington, D. C.: sir: Squadron. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal harbor, Nov. 8, 1861. The Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington: ske out. S. F. D. flag-ship Wabash, Hilton head, Port Royal Bay, Nov. 8, 1861. General order, No. 2.--It is the grateful duty of the Commankading Squadron. flag-ship Wabash, off Hilton head, Port Royal, Nov. 8, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles: sir: I have the honor to report the foll Report of Major Reynolds. U. S. Ship Sabine, at sea, November 8, 1861. sir: I have the honor to report that the marine battalion Sherman, Brig.-Gon. Commanding. Headquarters, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 8, 1861. Accounts by officers engaged in the battle. The followinn the action: U. S. Steamer Pocahontas, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 8, 1861. We were to have left Hampton Roads on the 25th October, but
at Cairo: General order no. 15. Brigade Headquarters, camp Cairo, November 8, 1861. The General commanding the First Brigade of Illinois Volunteers takes rder to the troops at Cairo: Headquarters District S. E. Mo., Cairo, November 8, 1861. The General commanding this military district returns his thanks to th Gen. Grant to Gen. Polk. Headquarters District S. E. Missouri, Cairo, November 8, 1861. General Commanding Forces, Columbus, Ky.: sir: In the skirmish of yestn. Grant. Headquarters First Division, Western Department, Columbus, Ky., November 8, 1861. Brig.-Gen. U. S. Grant, U. S. A.: I have received your note in regard Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply of President Davis. Richmond, Nov. 8, 1861. To Major-General Polk: Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, anral Grant, as stated above. Another account. camp McClernand, Cairo, Nov. 8, 1861. Ere this reaches you, you will have heard of the engagement of our force
ents under Gen. Pillow to his relief, then at intervals three others, then Gen. Cheatham. I then took over two others in person, to support a flank movement which I had directed. It was a hard-fought battle, lasting from half-past 10 A. M. to five P. M. They took Beltzhoover's battery, four pieces of which were re-captured. The enemy were thoroughly routed. We pursued them to their boats seven miles, then drove their boats before us. The road was strewn with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss considerable; theirs heavy. L. Polk, Major-General Commanding. Reply of President Davis. Richmond, Nov. 8, 1861. To Major-General Polk: Your telegraph received. Accept for yourself, and the officers and men under your command, my sincere thanks for the glorious contribution you have just made to our common cause. Our countrymen must long remember gratefully to read the activity and skill, courage and devotion of the army at Belmont. J. Davis.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 136. siege of Cotton Hill, Va., October 30 to November 7, 1861. (search)
Doc. 136. siege of Cotton Hill, Va., October 30 to November 7, 1861. A correspondent at the camp of the Second Kentucky regiment, in Western Virginia, gives the following account of the siege: camp Tompkins, Western Virginia, Nov. 8, 1861. For the past eight days the roar of artillery and musketry has been the only music we have danced to, and even while I write the booming of cannon still falls on my weary ear. The camp of our Second Kentucky regiment and the Headquarters of Generals Rosecrans and Cox are situated on top of Gauley Mount, on the farm of Colonel Tompkins, now in the rebel army, a gentleman of strong Southern proclivities, a graduate of West Point, and formerly in the United States army. This farm is his summer residence, he and his wife being residents of Richmond; she now occupies the house with her family, while he is somewhere in the neighborhood, assisting Floyd in driving the invaders from the soil. From our camp the road descends abruptly to the ri
y the enemy at the same time. It has a battery of some fifteen or twenty guns, which we shall take possession of in the morning. This victory was won altogether by the fleet. New York times narrative. Hilton head Island, S. C. Friday, Nov. 8, 1861. I shall endeavor to give a faithful narrative of the conflict, its attendant circumstances, and such other matters as may seem to be of interest. The day itself was more beautiful, if any thing, than the finest with which we had beeor some reason they failed to appear, and the South Carolinians were forced into the fight with less than two thousand men at both their positions. H. J. W. National Intelligencer account. Hilton head, Port Royal entrance, S. C. Friday, November 8, 1861. We reached this point on Monday morning last, after encountering a violent gale, (on Friday the 1st instant,) which dispersed our fleet, and caused the loss of four of the vessels composing it, viz., the Peerless, Governor, Osceola,
ant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Instructions to Lieut. Fairfax. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, November 8, 1861. sir: You will have the second and third cutters of this ship fully manned and armed, and be in all respects prepared to board the steamer Trent now hove H. P. Grace, Boatswain U. S. Navy. Captain Charles Wilkes, Commanding U. S. Steamer San Jacinto. Copy from the log book of the San Jacinto. At sea. Friday, Nov. 8, 1861. From eight A. M. to meridian: As per calculation, lying — to off Paredon lights; at half-past 10 a bark in sight to the eastward and a schooner to the obligations. I am, respectfully, your obedient servant, Gideon Welles. Statement of the purser of the Trent. Royal mail steamship Trent, At sea, November 8, 1861. To the Editor of the London Times: sir: I hasten to forward you some particulars of the grievous outrage committed to-day against the English flag by the
Doc. 140. Col. Grensle's proclamation. November 8, 1861. To the People of the Town of Houston and County of Texas, Missouri: I have this day placed upon your beautiful court house the flag of our Union. I leave it in your charge and protection. If taken down by rebel hands, I will return here and pillage every house in the town owned by secessionists or those who sympathize with rebels. Any outrages hereafter committed upon Union men or their families, will be returned on the secessionists twofold. Property taken from Union men by the rebels, in or out of the county, must be returned immediately. I hereby give the rebels ten days to make good all losses sustained by Union families in Texas County. If neglected, the consequences be upon your heads. I shall soon return to your county, and shall see that this proclamation is complied with to the letter. If you wait for me to execute it, I will do it with a vengeance. N. Grensle, Colonel Commanding.
Doc. 228. Vallandigham's resolution approving the act of Captain Wilkes. Whereas, The Secretary of the Navy has reported to this House, that Captain Charles Wilkes, in command of the San Jacinto, an armed public vessel of the United States, did, on the 8th of November, 1861, on the high seas, intercept the Trent, a British mail steamer, and forcibly remove therefrom James M. Mason and John Slidell, disloyal citizens, leading conspirators, rebel enemies and dangerous men, who, with their suite, were on their way to Europe to promote the cause of the insurrection, claiming to be ambassadors from the seceded Confederate States; and Whereas, The Secretary of the Navy has further reported to this House that the prompt and decisive action of Captain Wilkes on this occasion merited and received the emphatic approval of the Department, and, moreover, in a public letter has thanked Captain Wilkes for the act; and Whereas, This House on the first day of the session did propose to ten