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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 22 22 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 11 11 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 19, 1861., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 4 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 16, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for November 8th, 1861 AD or search for November 8th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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The Daily Dispatch: November 25, 1861., [Electronic resource], Letter from George N. Saunders to Louis Kossuth. (search)
Letter from George N. Saunders to Louis Kossuth. We find in our Southern exchanges the following interesting letter from George N. Saunders to Louis Kossuth: Nashville, Tenn., Nov. 8, 1861. My Dear Governor: Your old and trusted friend, * * * *, has just arrived here from his new home in * * * * *. As he is about to leave for Europe, I embrace the opportunity his going offers to say a word to you on American affairs. It must be difficult for you to comprehend that a people who flocked by tens and hundreds of thousands to listen to your immortal words upon the rights of States and "peoples" to govern themselves in their own way, should, in a few short years, forget all your wise teachings, and surrender themselves to a political and military despotism worse in all of its aspects than that from which you had just escaped. A despotism erected for the sole purpose of subjugating independent States and a free people, allied to them by all the ties which civilized