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Appendix A. Through the politeness of the Secretary of War, Mr. Belknap, the writer received the following statement of the strength of Sherman's command on the 10th of November: War, Department, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, December 14, 1875. Official transcript from the return of the Department of the Cumberland, showing the strength, present and absent, on the 10th day of November, 1861, the date of the last report received at this office before Brigadier-General Sherman was relieved of that command: No. in commands that furnished returns to department headquarters,30,917 No. in commands not furnishing returns, about9,100 Regiments in process of formation, estimated9,600 Total49,617 E. D. Townsend, Adjutant-General.
risoners with the enemy, 100 of their prisoners still remain in my hands, one stand of colors, and a fraction over 1,000 stand of arms, with knapsacks, ammunition, and other military stores. The Rev. P. C. Headley, in his Life of Grant, says, The rebels lost 2,800 men. Badeau says: At Belmont, General Grant lost 485 men in killed, wounded, and missing; 125 of his wounded fell into the hands of the rebels; he carried off 175 prisoners and two guns. General Polk, writing November 10, 1861, could not be mistaken as to the number of prisoners. The number of dead must have been much over 100; and, if the wounded were in any ordinary ratio to the other losses, the writer is constrained to believe that General Badeau is in error in his statement of the losses of Grant's army at Belmont. The universal testimony of those who remained masters of the field made it much greater than he sets it down. General Grant, writing to his father soon after the battle, says: Gen
e's, were: Grant50,000 Buell37,000 Mitchell18,000 Total105,000 To engage these it will be seen that he was able to get together about 40,000 available troops at Shiloh. Appendix A. Memorandum.6276 a, G. 0. 75. War Department, Adjutant-General's Office, Washington, December 17, 1875. Statement showing the number of troops, present and absent, in the commands of Generals Sherman, Grant, and Buell, at the dates hereinafter specified. General Sherman's command, November 10, 1861. In commands that furnished returns to department headquarters30,917 In commands not furnishing returns (about)9,100 Regiments in process of formation (estimated)9,600 Total49,617 General Grant's command, February 1, 186227,113 General Buell's command, February 20, 1862103,864 General Grant's command, April 1, 186268,175 General Buell's command, April 30, 1862101,051 note.-Owing to the absence of returns of a uniform date, the above figures have been taken from such return
m General Polk and Columbus arrival of Polk on the field the Federal troops defeated and spoils taken characters of General Pillow and General Polk compared misrepresentations of the Northern press. I had only just returned to my regiment at Leesburgh when I received a letter from a Kentucky friend, serving under General Polk, at Columbus, descriptive of the engagement at Belmont, which had been fought some time before at the village of that name in Missouri: Columbus, Ky., Nov. 10th, 1861. Dear Tom: You will, ere this reaches you, have heard more than one account of the late fight at Belmont; but this will satisfy you that I am all right, and ready to have another shake with the Great Anaconda, so much talked of in the North. In my former letter, I fully informed you of the stupendous works raised here by General Gustavus Smith, and of our having occupied Belmont opposite, so as to command both banks of the stream. But the enemy appeared to know as well as we did th
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 12.46 (search)
st of all, time to collect or create an army. And then (I hold in spite of some dilettante criticism) it gave him a formidable line, with Cumberland Gap and Columbus as the extremities and Bowling Green as the salient. the result more than answered his expectations. Buckner's advance produced the wildest consternation in the Federal lines. Even Sherman, writing thirteen years later, speaks of a picket which burned a bridge thirty miles from Louisville as a division. as late as November 10th, 1861, he said: if Johnston chooses, he could march into Louisville any day. the effect of the movement was for a time to paralyze the Federal army and put it on the defensive. Camp Burgess, Bowling Green--the 70th Indiana on dress parade. From a lithograph. On the hill are seen the Confederate fortifications erected by General Buckner. General Johnston had made the opportunity required by the South, if it meant seriously to maintain its independence. He had secured time for pre
otomac, and generally to provide for the public defense. For these public considerations, I call upon you as the commanding general, and as a party to all the conferences held by me on the 21st and 22d of July, to say whether I obstructed the pursuit of the enemy after the victory at Manassas, or have ever objected to an advance or other active operation which it was feasible for the army to undertake? Very respectfully yours, etc., Jefferson Davis. headquarters, Centreville, November 10, 1861. To His Excellency, the President.- Sir: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 3d instant, in which you call upon me, as the Commanding General, and as a party to all the conferences held by you on the 21st and 22d of July, to say: Whether I obstructed the pursuit after the battle of Manassas. Or have ever objected to an advance, or other active operations which it was feasible for the army to undertake. To the first question I reply: No. The pursuit was o
ical Seminary of that State. He will go, as there is no hope of his getting back to Alexandria during the war. Nothing from the Fleet. November 9, 1861. Our hearts cheered by news from the fleet. A part of it stranded-one vessel on the coast of North Carolina, from which seventy prisoners have been taken; others on the coast of South Carolina. Unfortunately, a part is safe, and is attacking Tybee Island. The fortifications there are said to be strong and well manned. November 10th, 1861. Returning from church to-day, we were overtaken by W. B. C., on horseback. We were surprised and delighted. He soon explained his position. Jackson's Brigade has been ordered to take charge of the Valley, and is coming to-day to Strasburg, and thence to Winchester. He rode across on R's horse. He dined with us, and told us a great deal about the army, particularly about our own boys. We are greatly relieved to have that noble brigade in our midst; we have felt, for a long ti
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 13: responsibility for the failure to pursue. (search)
the Potomac, and generally to provide for the public defence. For these public considerations I call upon you, as the commanding general, and as a party to all the conferences held by me on July 21st and 22d, to say whether I obstructed the pursuit of the enemy after the victory of Manassas, or have ever objected to an advance or other active operation which it was feasible for the army to undertake. Very respectfully yours, etc., Jefferson Davis. headquarters, Centreville, November 10, 1861. To his Excellency the President. Sir: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 3d instant, in which you call upon me as the commanding general, and as a party to all the conferences held by you on July 21st and 22d, to say whether you obstructed the pursuit after the victory of Manassas, or have ever objected to an advance or other active operation which it was feasible for the army to undertake? To the first question I reply, No; the pursuit was obstructed by the enemy'
ly on account of his motives and his defect of judgment. This letter of Mr. Benjamin staggered General Beauregard, and he, overlooking Mr. Benjamin, referred the letter to the President. The President replied to the General, under date of November 10, 1861, and below his letter is given entire: Richmond, Va., November 10, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va. Sir: When I addressed you in relation to your complaint because of the letters written to you by Mr. Benjamin, Acting Secretary oNovember 10, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va. Sir: When I addressed you in relation to your complaint because of the letters written to you by Mr. Benjamin, Acting Secretary of War, it was hoped that you would see that you had misinterpreted his expressions, and would be content. But while in yours of the 6th instant you accept the assurance given that Mr. Benjamin could not have intended to give you offence, you serve notice that your motives must not be called into question, and that when your errors are pointed out it must be done in proper tone and style, and express the fear that Mr. Benjamin will, under all circumstances, view only the legal aspect of thin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
t servant, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy, Washington. Report of Lieutenant-Commander C. R. P. Rodgers. United States Steamer Wabash, Port Royal, Nov. 10, 1861. Sir-Although I know that the conduct of the officers and crew of the Wabash are warmly commended by you in the action of the 7th instant, yet, in obedience to your demand for a special report, I respectfully submit the following: The mT. H. Stevens, Lieutenant-Commander, U. S. N. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Blockading Squadron. Order for Unadilla and other ships to take possession of Beaufort, S. C. Flag-Ship, Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 10, 1861. Sir-It has been reported to me by Lieutenant-Commander Ammen that, on taking possession of the town of Beaufort, under my orders of the 8th instant, he found that most of the white inhabitants had abandoned the town, and that the negroes
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