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Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 13: responsibility for the failure to pursue. (search)
the Potomac, and generally to provide for the public defence. For these public considerations I call upon you, as the commanding general, and as a party to all the conferences held by me on July 21st and 22d, to say whether I obstructed the pursuit of the enemy after the victory of Manassas, or have ever objected to an advance or other active operation which it was feasible for the army to undertake. Very respectfully yours, etc., Jefferson Davis. headquarters, Centreville, November 10, 1861. To his Excellency the President. Sir: I have had the honor to receive your letter of the 3d instant, in which you call upon me as the commanding general, and as a party to all the conferences held by you on July 21st and 22d, to say whether you obstructed the pursuit after the victory of Manassas, or have ever objected to an advance or other active operation which it was feasible for the army to undertake? To the first question I reply, No; the pursuit was obstructed by the enemy'
ly on account of his motives and his defect of judgment. This letter of Mr. Benjamin staggered General Beauregard, and he, overlooking Mr. Benjamin, referred the letter to the President. The President replied to the General, under date of November 10, 1861, and below his letter is given entire: Richmond, Va., November 10, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va. Sir: When I addressed you in relation to your complaint because of the letters written to you by Mr. Benjamin, Acting Secretary oNovember 10, 1861. General Beauregard, Manassas, Va. Sir: When I addressed you in relation to your complaint because of the letters written to you by Mr. Benjamin, Acting Secretary of War, it was hoped that you would see that you had misinterpreted his expressions, and would be content. But while in yours of the 6th instant you accept the assurance given that Mr. Benjamin could not have intended to give you offence, you serve notice that your motives must not be called into question, and that when your errors are pointed out it must be done in proper tone and style, and express the fear that Mr. Benjamin will, under all circumstances, view only the legal aspect of thin