Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for November 10th, 1861 AD or search for November 10th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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e back of the head, but is doing well. Sergeant Chase was shot through the arm — doing well. Two of our guns destroyed a famous battery of nine guns, called the Washington battery, from New Orleans. We brought off two of their guns, but had to leave two of our caissonbodies. I brought off one of them with my caisson-teams, a brass six-pounder, engraved on the breech Lee, John Clark, maker, New Orleans, La. Rebel accounts of the battle. Memphis appeal narrative. Columbus, Nov. 10, 1861. Thursday, the 7th day of November, 1861, as your columns have already announced, was an eventful day to the Confederate cause in the Northwest--the advance of the first column of the enemy, as a prisoner has remarked, upon New Orleans, though, more properly speaking, upon Columbus. Things had worn their wonted aspect of quiet up to six A. M. on that morning, with the exception of an occasional piece of impudence on the part of the Lincolnites, in the shape of near approaches with sm
Rebel accounts of the battle. Memphis appeal narrative. Columbus, Nov. 10, 1861. Thursday, the 7th day of November, 1861, as your columns have already announced, was an eventful day to the Confederate cause in the Northwest--the advance of the first column of the enemy, as a prisoner has remarked, upon New Orleans, though, more properly speaking, upon Columbus. Things had worn their wonted aspect of quiet up to six A. M. on that morning, with the exception of an occasional piece of impudence on the part of the Lincolnites, in the shape of near approaches with small bodies of their men to our lines, without any skirmishing, however, for some two weeks. On the morning of the 7th, about six o'clock, boats were seen landing troops some seven miles above Columbus, on the opposite side of the river, near Hunter's Landing. Information was immediately conveyed to Headquarters. The number of the boats, however, seemed to imply that they were after larger game than was known
ing, and Joseph Bailey. Company C, Captain Wiley: one wounded, Alfred Dougherty. Wounded of the Second Ohio, mostly belonging to Company A, Captain Berryhill: Captain Berryhill, David Hilt, Patrick Flaherty, John Elstrip, Haw. Wilson, Joseph Carter, Corporal E. B. Simpson, Corporal Fesh, Henry Giese, pioneer; Stephen A. Coleman, scout, all abed. John S. Bayless, Chaplain Col. Marshall's Regiment Ky. Vol. Gen. Nelson's order. Headquarters camp hopeless chase, Piketon, Ky., Nov. 10, 1861. soldiers: I thank you for what you have done. In a campaign of twenty days you have driven the rebels from Eastern Kentucky, and given repose to that portion of the State. You have made continual forced marches over wretched roads, deep in mud; badly clad, you have bivouacked on the wet ground in the November rains without a murmur. With scarce half rations, you have pressed forward with unfailing perseverance. The only place that the enemy made a stand, though ambushed and very
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 146. fight on the Wautauga River, November 10, 1861. (search)
Doc. 146. fight on the Wautauga River, November 10, 1861. Secession reports. Richmond, Va., Nov. 11. in consequence of private intelligence received at Bristol of the doings of the Union men in East Tennessee, Captain Miller picked up a party of twenty-two young men, accompanied by Mr. J. R. Howard as a volunteer, and started from Bristol by the railroad at six o'clock. They sent lanterns ahead of the train and found the track torn up between Wautauga and the Union Station Bridge; but the damage was soon repaired, and they passed over safely. Arriving at Carter's Station, they stopped and threw out pickets, and about midnight the little scouting party, under Captain Miller, started to explore the country. They had proceeded some three and a half miles through Carter County, Tennessee, when they were met by a pretty heavy fire from rifles and shot-guns, which was promptly returned, and the skirmish was kept up with spirit for half a hour. The Lincolnites were some three
Doc. 149. fight at Gauley Bridge, Va. November 10, 1861. At daylight on the morning of the 10th November, Col. De Villiers crossed the New River, with the first detachment from his regiment, the Eleventh Ohio. The river was swollen and rapid, but in spite of the difficulties which it presented, the colonel had passed over before noon, nearly the whole available force under his command. At 12 o'clock he drove in the enemy's pickets, planted our flag in their breastworks, and posted guards all along the ridge overlooking our communications. In driving in the pickets, John Roe, private of Company A, pressed forward far in advance of his companions, and received a ball from a Mississippi rifle through his head, killing him instantly. It required a long, extended line of sentinels to guard the ridge of its whole length; consequently the posts in each were weak and widely separated from their reserve. At eight o'clock in the evening the enemy in full force made an attack upon
If any alarm be given during the attempt to capture the schooner, you will return immediately. You can either destroy the schooner or bring her to the ship; you will exercise your own judgment in regard to this. I am, respectfully, yours, Henry Eagle, Captain. Lieut. James E. Jouett, U. S. N., to command the expedition; Lieut. John G. Mitchell, U. S. N., to take charge of the second launch. New York times account. United States frigate Santee, off Galveston, Texas, Sunday, Nov. 10, 1861. As I was a witness in most that took place on the night on which the Royal Yacht was burned, (the 7th,) you will perhaps like to have a sketch of the proceedings. The question was mooted as to the armed schooner being allowed to come out every night and anchoring in the channel, between the forts Bolivar--a new fort just erected — Point Fort, Galveston Fort, Pelican Island, and Pelican Spit Fort, which mounts three guns. On the 7th Mr. Jouett went aloft, and after a long survey