Your search returned 70 results in 46 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5
en drove their boats before us. The road was strewed with their dead and wounded, guns, ammunition, and equipments. Our loss, considerable; theirs, heavy. L. Polk, Major-General commanding. To general headquarters, through General A. S. Johnston. This report, made on the day of battle, is substantially accurate, except that the force of the enemy is over-estimated. General Grant represents his purpose and procedure in this movement as follows, in his report from Cairo, of November 12, 1861: On the evening of the 6th instant I left this place with 2,850 men, of all arms, to make a reconnaissance toward Columbus. The object of the expedition was to prevent the enemy from sending out reinforcements to Price's army in Missouri, and also from cutting off columns that I had been directed to send out from this place and Cape Girardeau, in pursuit of Jeff Thompson. Knowing that Columbus was strongly garrisoned, I asked General Smith, commanding at Paducah, Kentucky, to m
November 15. The following challenge appeared in the Louisville Journal of this day: camp Sherman, Jeffersonville, November 12, 1861. Will you oblige by inserting the following: I hear that in connection with other braggadocio they brag a great deal, among the Confederate troops, in regard to their fine field-music. Therefore I, W. F. Robinson, do challenge any fifer in the Confederate army to perform with me on the fife for the sum of five hundred ($500) dollars a side. The music to be played shall be selected by both parties, Yankee Doodle and the Star-Spangled Banner to be included in the list. The trial match to come off when Buckner and his army have been taken prisoners, or as soon thereafter as practicable, the challenged party to have the choice of ground, provided every thing be peaceable. Any communication sent to Major W. F. Robinson, First Wisconsin Volunteers, Louisville, Ky., will meet with prompt attention. U. S. Steamer San Jacinto, Capt. Wilk
and other respectable United States sea-dogs, I am able, from a personal inspection of the craft, as well as from an account which I have gathered from eye-witnesses, to furnish your readers with an intelligible description of the capture of the Atlanta by the Weehawken. And, first, we may as well settle the nativity of said vessel, as much discussion has already arisen here as to whether she is, or was, the Fingal, the Georgia, or the Atlanta. You will recollect, that upon the twelfth of November, 1861, the Fingal, an English, Clydebuilt steamer, ran our blockade, and carried a valuable cargo of arms and ammunition in to the rebels at Savannah. She had aboard of her also several batteries of the celebrated Armstrong guns, which the rebels immediately mounted in Fort Pulaski, and which fell into our hands when we captured that fort. In the following January, the rebels having loaded the Fingal with a cargo of one thousand bales of cotton, endeavored to re-run the blockade, but we
There were no movements thereafter in South Carolina under Hunter; save that Col. Montgomery, with 300 of his 2d S. C. (negroes) on two steamboats, went June 2. 25 miles up the Combahee river, burnt a pontoon-bridge, with some private property, and brought away 727 very willing slaves — all that they could take, but not nearly all that wished to be taken. The 2d S. C. recruited two full companies out of the spoils. The Fingal, a British-built blockade-runner, which had slipped Nov. 12, 1861. into Savannah with a valuable cargo of arms, and been loaded with cotton for her return, found herself unable, especially after the fall of Pulaski, to slip out again; and, after many luckless attempts, was unloaded, and iron-clad into what was esteemed a high state of warlike efficiency--14 months having been devoted to the work. She was now christened the Atlanta, and, wafted from the wharves of Savannah by a breeze of prayers and good wishes, moved down the inlet known as Wilmington
Va. 24 97   121 Deep Bottom, Va. (6 cos.), August 14, 1864   2   2 Ream's Station, Va. (6 cos.)   2 29 31 White Oak Road, Va., March 31, 1865 5 23 2 30 Sutherland Station, Va., April 2, 1865 6 27 3 36   Totals 95 541 116 752 Present, also, at Peach Orchard; Savage Station; Malvern Hill; Hatcher's Run; Sailor's Creek; Appomattox. notes.--Recruited in New York City, was mustered in by companies from August 3 to November 4, 1861. It proceeded to Washington, November 12, 1861, where it was assigned to the Third Brigade, First Division, Second Corps, in which it remained during its entire service. In April, 1862, the Fifty-second accompanied the corps to the Peninsula, and at Fair Oaks the regiment went into its first action, where, under command of Colonel Frank, it establised a reputation for efficiency underfire. Out of 320 who were engaged there, 122 were killed or wounded, while each of the field-officers had their horses shot under them. But the dea
Doc. 133. the battle at Belmont, Mo., fought November 7, 1861. Gen. Grant's report. Cairo, Nov. 12, 1861. on the evening of the 6th inst. I left this place with two thousand eight hundred and fifty men of all arms, to make a reconnoissance toward Columbus. The object of the expedition was to prevent the enemy from sending out reinforcements to Price's army in Missouri, and also from cutting off columns that I had been directed to send out from this place and Cape Girardeau, in puports throughout. For particulars see accompanying report of Capt. Walker. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, U. S. Grant, Brig.-Gen. Commanding. General McClernand's report. Brigade Headquarters, camp Cairo, Nov. 12, 1861. Brigadier-General U. S. Grant, Commanding District Southeastern Missouri: sir: I have the honor to report the part taken by the forces under my command in the action before Columbus, Ky., on the 7th inst. These forces consisted of a po
States Navy. Report of Lieut. Fairfax. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, November 12, 1861. sir: At one twenty P. M., on the 8th instant, I repaired alongside of the British mailing San Jacinto. Report of Lieut. Greer. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, Nov. 12, 1861. sir: In accordance with your instructions, I submit the following: On November 8th, betwan Jacinto. Report of Robert G. Simpson. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, Nov. 12, 1861. sir: In compliance with your order of yesterday, I have the honor to state the following Jacinto. Report of Charles B. Dahlgren. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, Nov. 12, 1861. sir: In obedience to your order, I hereby state that I was one of those who boarded the arles Wilkes. Report of Boatswain Grace. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, Nov. 12, 1861. sir: In obedience to your orders of the 11th instant, I have the honor to make the follo
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 147. drawing Lots at Richmond, Va. (search)
essary to draw by lot three captains. The first names drawn were Captains J. B. Ricketts, H. McQuade, and J. W. Rockwood. The list of thirteen will therefore stand: Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff, and Wood; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere, and Vogdes; Captains Ricketts, McQuade, and Rockwood. Respectfully, your obedient servant, John. H. Winder, Brigadier-Gene. Hon. J. P. Benjamin, Sec. of War. Headquarters Department of Henrico, Richmond, Va., November 12, 1861. sir: In obedience to your instructions, all the wounded officers have been exempted as hostages, to await the result of the trial of prisoners captured by the enemy at sea. I have therefore made selections, by lot, of Captains H. Bowman and T. Keffer to replace Captains Ricketts and McQuade, wounded. The list of thirteen will now stand: Colonels Lee, Cogswell, Wilcox, Woodruff, and Wood; Lieutenant-Colonels Bowman and Neff; Majors Potter, Revere, and Vogdes; Captains Rockwood, B
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 151. battle of little Blue, Mo. (search)
Doc. 151. battle of little Blue, Mo. A correspondent gives the following account of this action: camp Jennison, Kansas City, Nov. 12, 1861. The Jayhawkers have already vindicated their reputation for daring, celerity, vigor, and pluck. Night before last, two companies, B and H, and part of Company A, under Capts. Swoyer and Pardee and Lobnis, commanded by Col. Anthony, left camp for Majors' Farm, about ten miles south, where the Government wagons and oxen were coralled. Reports had come in that a force of rebel guerillas, under Col. Hays, which were reported encamped on the Little Blue, had threatened to attack the train. Yesterday morning early, Company C, Capt. Jenkins, was sent to reinforce. Information was soon after received that a fight had taken place, and some of our boys killed. This latter was confirmed by the arrival of messengers for the surgeon. It appears that Col. Anthony, receiving information Sunday night that there was a rebel camp at a point ei
S. V. To Brig.-Gen. D. E. Sickles, Headquarters Excelsior Brigade, Asbury, near Mattowoman Creek, Md. A correspondent of the New York Times gives the following circumstantial account of this reconnoissance: Charles County, Md., Tuesday, Nov. 12, 1861. There is no place on the whole Potomac about which so much has been said, and so little known, as Matthias Point. It was off this point that the lamented and gallant Ward met his untimely death, and within more recent dates rumor has its formation, early in June last — a remarkable state of health for a regiment constantly in active service. I enclose the official report of this most successful reconnoissance. Nemo. A secession account. Fredericksbubg, Va., November 12, 1861. The enemy made a landing at Matthias Point about two hours before daylight on Monday morning, in numbers reported at from sixty to two hundred. They immediately moved outward into the country, but so quiet had been the landing that o
1 2 3 4 5