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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 14.55 (search)
hip at a later hour, reported the finding of the barrel-buoy, and were informed that the entrance would soon be sounded out. About noon, Captain C. A. Boutelle, in the Coast Survey steamer Vixen, with the gun-boats Pawnee, Ottawa, Pembina, Curlew, and Seneca, crossed the bar and went far enough in to have a good view of the faces and embrasures of the earth-works that we were soon to engage, the one on Hilton Head known as Fort Walker and the other on Bay Point as Fort Beauregard. On Nov. 15th, 1861, General T. W. Sherman changed the name of Fort Walker to Fort Welles (after Secretary Welles), and of Fort Beauregard to Fort Seward (after the Secretary of State). After the surveying steamer had planted some buoys, to serve as general guides, the four gun-boats last named anchored in the channel some distance apart, as additional guides, the one farthest in being Sloop of War Vandalia, rear ship of the line at Port Royal. From a War-time sketch. some three miles from Fort Beau
yself went to Winchester, and thence to the camp. We took Mr. P. N's children to see their father. There we saw W. B., J. M. G., and many other young friends, and were much pleased at their cheerfulness. They look sunburnt and soldierly. I returned to Winchester to see my dear S. S. R. C. was sitting with her, looking well and happy. Camp-life agrees with him. These poor boys expect to be ordered to Romney; but wherever they go, they hope, by God's help, to repel the invaders. November 15th, 1861. This was fast-day — a national fast proclaimed by our President. I trust that every church in the Confederacy was well filled with heart-worshippers. The Rev. Mr. Jones preached for us at Millwood. This whole household was there-indeed, the whole neighbourhood turned out. We have been anxiously awaiting the result of an anticipated fight between Price and Fremont; but Fremont was superseded while almost in the act of making the attack. We await further developments. Wi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
ectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Steedman, Commander. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commander-in-Chief of Naval Forces, etc., etc. Report of Lieutenant-Commander Daniel Ammen. United States Gun-Boat Seneca, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 15, 1861. Sir-In obedience to your order of this date, I nave the honor to make the following report: On Monday, the 4th, this vessel entered Port Royal, and sounded the channel until within three miles of Bay Point, when we were signalled from d from each Navy Yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Flag-officer Dupont's report concerning the Marine battalion, Nov. 15. Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Nov. 15, 1861. Sir — I avail myself of the first moment of leisure to transmit to you the report of Major John George Reynolds, commanding the battalion of marines attached to my squadron, in which he relates all the circumstances attending the loss of
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
ectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Steedman, Commander. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commander-in-Chief of Naval Forces, etc., etc. Report of Lieutenant-Commander Daniel Ammen. United States Gun-Boat Seneca, Port Royal, S. C., Nov. 15, 1861. Sir-In obedience to your order of this date, I nave the honor to make the following report: On Monday, the 4th, this vessel entered Port Royal, and sounded the channel until within three miles of Bay Point, when we were signalled from d from each Navy Yard at meridian on the day after the receipt of this order. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Flag-officer Dupont's report concerning the Marine battalion, Nov. 15. Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, S. C., Nov. 15, 1861. Sir — I avail myself of the first moment of leisure to transmit to you the report of Major John George Reynolds, commanding the battalion of marines attached to my squadron, in which he relates all the circumstances attending the loss of
Arkansas. Price returns to Missouri guerrilla operations Rains and Stein routed capture of Milford Price retreats to Arkansas Sigel's retreat from Bentonville battle of Pea Ridge Rebels defeated the War among the Indians fight at the Cache guerrilla operations fight at Newtonia Hindman driven into Arkansas Cooper routed at Maysville battle of Prairie Grove. Gen. Sterling Price was a good deal less indignant than any Unionist at the unaccountable desertion Nov. 2-15, 1861. See Vol. I., pages 593-4. of south-western Missouri by the new Union commander, directly on the heels of Fremont's triumphant and unresisted advance, when assured that his scouts were not mistaken in reporting the evacuation of Spring-field and retreat to Rolla, by an army which he would not have dared to attack. He gradually retraced his steps from the Arkansas border, entering Springfield in triumph, and subsequently advancing to Osceola, on the Osage, thence pushing forward his force
Doc. 139. capture of Mason and Slidell. Captain Wilkes' report. United States steamer San Jacinto, November 15, 1861. sir: I have written to you, relative to the movements of this ship, from Cienfuegos, on the south coast of Cuba. There I learned that Messrs. Slidell and Mason had landed on Cuba, and had reached the Havana from Charleston. I took in some sixty tons of coal and left with all despatch on the 26th of October to intercept the return of the Theodora; but on my arrivaI may add that, having assumed the responsibility, I am willing to abide the result. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes, Captain. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. United States steamer San Jacinto, November 15, 1861. sir: Before leaving your ship, we think it proper that we should state that since we have been on board of her, we have uniformly been treated with great courtesy and attention. Very respectfully, your obedient servants, John Slidel
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 162. affair of the schooner Maryland. (search)
Doc. 162. affair of the schooner Maryland. New York times account, Baltimore, Friday, Nov. 15, 1861. from Lieut. C. H. Colburn, of the Eleventh Massachusetts regiment, Company H, attached to Gen. Hooker's brigade, on the Maryland shore of the Potomac, and who arrived in this city this evening, I have the following interesting particulars of a rebel attack upon the schooner Maryland. The schooner was loaded with wood, and yesterday, while passing the rebel battery off Pig Point, and directly off the encampment of the Massachusetts Eleventh, became becalmed. The crew, immediately on perceiving preparations making by the rebels to attack their vessel from the Virginia shore, dropped their anchor, and taking to their boats, rowed away to the United States flotilla, which was anchored about four miles up the river. Lieut. W. L. Chandler, of the Eleventh, in command, and accompanied by Lieut. Colburn and two or three others, immediately leaped into a small boat and put off
tinguished himself in the defence of a western post against the combined attack of a large force of British and Indians. General Benham conversed with him, received his last wishes, and placed him in care of the brigade surgeon, but he died on the evening of the 14th. The following letter, addressed to General Floyd, shows that General Benham has done all in his power to regard the last wishes of the brave but fatally mistaken man: Headquarters First Provl. Brigade, U. S. Forces, Nov. 15, 1861, at Hawkins' Farm, Five miles S. E. of Fayetteville. Brig.-Gen. J. B. Floyd, C. S. A.: sir: In the skirmish which occurred yesterday between the United States forces under my command and your brigade, I regret to be obliged to inform you that Colonel St. George Croghan, commanding your cavalry regiment, as he stated to me, was mortally wounded. He was shot through the right wrist and side of the upper portion of the abdomen, the ball passing entirely through the body, and lived from
Doc. 164. fast day in the South. November 15, 1861, was observed by the rebels as a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer. The following is Jeff. Davis' proclamation: by the President-A proclamation. Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God, the Sovereign Disposer of events, to protect and defend the Confederate States hitherto, in their conflict with their enemies, and to be unto them a shield: And, whereas with grateful thanks we recognize His hand, and acknowledge that not unto us, but unto Him, belongeth the victory; and in humble dependence upon His Almighty strength, and trusting in the justness of our cause, we appeal to Him, that He may set at naught the efforts of our enemies, and put them to confusion and shame; Now, therefore, I, Jefferson Davis, President of the Confederate States, in view of the impending conflict, do hereby set apart Friday, the 15th day of November, as a day of fasting, humiliation, and prayer; and I do hereby invite the Reverend Cle
Doc. 165. capture of a secession flag, at Manchester, Mo., Nov. 15, 1861. The following is an account of the capture, as given by the Missouri Republican: camp Herron, Mo., Ninth regiment Iowa Vols., Nov. 18, 1861. The commander of this post, having learned that a certain very fine secession flag that had waved defiantly from a flagstaff in the village of Manchester, twenty miles distant from this place, until the successes of the Union forces caused its supporters to conclude that, for the present, discretion would be the better part of valor, was still being very carefully preserved, its possessors boasting that they would soon be enabled to rehoist it, determined upon its capture. On the 15th inst., he directed First Lieutenant H. C. Bull, of Company C, of this regiment, to take charge of the expedition, and to detail fifteen good men for the purpose, which detail the lieutenant made from Company C. They left camp by the cars at half-past 5 P. M., landing at M
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