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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
them, killing and wounding several of the enemy, and the reconnoissance having been completed the vessel returned to Cairo. The Taylor and Lexington were constantly employed on such service, and their value soon became apparent to the army officers, who had at first thought they would be of little use. Soon after the above mentioned reconnoissance. General Grant wrote to Commander Walke, requesting the services of the gun-boats to accompany him to Belmont landing, and on the 16th of November, 1861, the General started down the river with 3.100 men in transports, convoyed by the Taylor, Com. Walke, and the Lexington, Corn. R. N. Stembel. Grant landed his troops at Hunter's Point, on the Missouri side, out of range of the Columbus batteries, and marched direct on Belmont, three miles distant, where the Confederates had posted their camp in an open space protected by fallen timber. By nine o'clock Grant's entire command was hotly engaged, except one battalion left at the landi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
nkful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, Pen. G. Watmough, Acting-Lieutenant-Commander. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. Respectfully forwarded, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer. Commendatory letter to Flag-officer Dupont. Navy Department, November 16, 1861. Sir-It is with no ordinary emotion that I tender to you and your command the heartfelt congratulations and thanks of the Government and the country for the brilliant success achieved at Port Royal. In the war now raging against the Government in this most causeless and unnatural rebellion that ever afflicted a country, high hopes have been indulged in the Navy, and great confidence reposed in its efforts. The results of the skill and bravery of yourself and others have equalled
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
nkful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, Pen. G. Watmough, Acting-Lieutenant-Commander. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. Respectfully forwarded, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer. Commendatory letter to Flag-officer Dupont. Navy Department, November 16, 1861. Sir-It is with no ordinary emotion that I tender to you and your command the heartfelt congratulations and thanks of the Government and the country for the brilliant success achieved at Port Royal. In the war now raging against the Government in this most causeless and unnatural rebellion that ever afflicted a country, high hopes have been indulged in the Navy, and great confidence reposed in its efforts. The results of the skill and bravery of yourself and others have equalled
o be, very respectfully, your obedient servants, John Slidell. J. M. Mason. George Eustis. J. E. Mcfarland. Captain Wilkes, U. S. Navy, Commanding San Jacinto. Reply of Captain Wilkes. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, November 16, 1861. gentlemen: Your letter dated the 9th inst. was handed to me yesterday. I shall transmit it, agreeably to your request, to the Hon. Secretary of the Navy, with my report of the transaction to which it refers. In reply to your wish tort of my report. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, Charles Wilkes. Messrs. John Slidell, James M. Mason, George Eustis, and J. E. Mcfarland. Captain Wilkes' final report. United States steamer San Jacinto, At sea, November 16, 1861. sir: In my despatch by Commander Taylor I confined myself to the report of the movements of this ship and the facts connected with the capture of Messrs. Mason, Slidell, Eustis, and McFarland, as I intended to write you particularly rel
Doc. 163. the pursuit of Floyd. Report of General Benham. Fayetteville C. H. Va., Nov. 16, 1861. I have the honor to report as follows in relation to the expedition from which I have this afternoon returned, by the order of General Schenck, from the pursuit of General Floyd, upon the road to Raleigh, by which he escaped by a most rapid and arduous march last night. Upon the night of the 11th inst., while at a kind of bivouac at Loup Creek mouth, where I had been with part of my command, by the directions of General Rosecrans, since the 5th and 6th insts., I received your orders to proceed as early as practicable with the force then at that point, about one thousand five hundred men, of the Tenth, Twelfth, and Thirteenth regiments, to occupy Cotton Hill, there having been previously stationed by his orders, under my directions, the Thirty-seventh regiment of seven hundred men at Loup Creek forks, about four miles up, and in detachments up to ten miles from the mouth of
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), An incident at the battle of Romney. (search)
An incident at the battle of Romney. Romney, Va., Nov. 16, 1861. While the National forces were standing under the enemy's fire, on the day of the battle here, and the shot and shell were flying in every direction around us, a little incident occurred which I think is worthy of notice. Capt. Butterfield, of the Eighth Ohio regiment, (being one of the ranking captains,) acted as major upon that occasion, and was obliged to ride an old sorrel horse, which had been used as a team horse, and required both spurs and whip, which the captain had provided himself with, the latter cut from a tree and about five feet long. It was found that our small six-pound guns would not reach the enemy's battery, and Col. Mason ordered Captain B. to bring forward a brass twelve-pounder which was in the rear Off sped the old sorrel and his brave rider, and in a few moments up came the gun. Its position was assigned and made ready for the match, but the captain came dashing back in front of the
y Colonel in Hampton's Legion. James Connor commanded a brigade in Lee's Army. Ellison Capers led a brigade in the Army of Tennessee. John D. Kennedy led a brigade in Longstreet's Corps. John S. Preston, chief of the Bureau of Conscription. of civil engineering until the outbreak of the Civil War, when he entered the Confederate Army. He participated in the capture of the Norfolk Navy Yard by the Virginia volunteers, raised and commanded the Sixth Virginia regiment and on November 16, 1861, he was appointed brigadier-general in the Confederate Army in March, 1864. In the battle of Seven Pines, General Mahone commanded a brigade in Huger's Division, while at Malvern Hill also his troops were engaged. General Mahone also fought in the Chancellorsville and Gettysburg campaigns, as well as in the Wilderness. At the North Anna on May 24th, General Mahone made a desperate attack on Warren's Corps, driving it back. On August 3, 1864, General Mahone was promoted to be major-
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller), General officers of the Confederate Army: a full roster compiled from the official records (search)
t. 19, 1862. Barksdale, W., Aug. 12, 1862. Barringer, Rufus, June 1, 1864. Barton, Seth M., Mar. 11, 1862. Battle, Cullen A., Aug. 20, 1863 Beall, W. N. R., April 11, 1862. Beale, R. L. T., Jan. 6, 1865. Bee, Barnard E., June 17, 1861. Bee, Hamilton P., Mar. 4, 1862. Bell, Tyree H., Feb. 28, 1865. Benning, H. L., Jan. 17, 1863. Boggs, William R., Nov. S, 1862. Bonham, M. L., April 23, 1861. Blanchard, A. G., Sept. 21, 1861. Buford, Abraham, Sept. 2, 1862. Branch, L. O. B., Nov. 16, 1861. Brandon, Wm. L., June 18, 1864. Bratton, John, May 6, 1864. Brevard, T. W., Mar. 22, 1865. Bryan, Goode, Aug. 29, 1863. Cabell, Wm. A., Jan. 20, 1863. Campbell, A. W., Mar. 1, 1865. Cantey, James, Jan. 8, 1863. Capers, Ellison, Mar. 1, 1865. Carroll, Wm. H., Oct. 26, 1861. Chalmers, J. R., Feb. 13, 1862. Chestnut, J., Jr. , April 23, 1864. Clark, Charles, May 22, 1861. Clark, John B., Mar. 8, 1864. Clanton, J. H., Nov. 16, 1863. Clingman, T. L., May 17, 1862. Cobb, T. R.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1861 (search)
RK--1st Cavalry (Cos. "B," "E," "G") 37th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--32d, 41st, 61st and 63d Infantry. ROHDE ISLAND--Battery "B" 1st Light Arty. Nov. 12: Skirmish, OccoquanNEW YORK--1st Cavalry (Co. "G"). Union loss, 3 killed, 1 wounded. Total, 4. Nov. 14-22: Expedition through Accomac and Northampton CountiesDELAWARE--2d Infantry. INDIANA--21st Infantry. MARYLAND--Purnell Legion Infantry. MASSACHUSETTS--2d Battery Light Arty.; 17th Infantry. NEW YORK--5th Infantry. WISCONSIN--4th Infantry. Nov. 16: Skirmish, Doolan's FarmNEW YORK--30th Infantry (Detachment). Nov. 18: Skirmish, Falls Church Road near Fairfax Court HouseNEW YORK--84th (14th S. M.) Infantry. Union loss, 2 killed, 1 wounded, 10 missing. Total, 13. Nov. 26: Skirmish, ViennaPENNSYLVANIA--3d Cavalry (Cos. "F," "M"). Union loss, 1 killed, 6 wounded, 26 missing. Total, 33. Nov. 26-27: Expedition to DranesvillePENNSYLVANIA--1st Cavalry. Nov. 26: Skirmish, Hunter's MilsPENNSYLVANIA--3d Cavalry (Cos. "F," "M"). Nov. 27: Ski
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.), Brigadier-Generals of the Confederate States Army, alphabetically arranged. (search)
Chalmers, Clayton and Gladden, and the troops under Major Bradford. 48Branch, L. O. B.N. CarolinaLt. Gen. A. P. HillNov. 16, 1861.Nov. 16, 1861. Dec. 13, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg; brigade composed of the 7th, 18th, 28th, 33d and 37th North CarolNov. 16, 1861. Dec. 13, 1861. Killed at Sharpsburg; brigade composed of the 7th, 18th, 28th, 33d and 37th North Carolina regiments, A. P. Hill's division, Army of Northern Virginia. 49Brandon, Wm. L.MississippiMaj. Gen. D. H. HillJune 18, 1864.June 18, 1864.   Assigned to the command of a brigade of cavalry in Mississippi. 50Brantly, W. F.MississippiGen. J. B. Hla; afterwards in command of the District of Texas, New Mexico and Arizona. 281Mahone, WilliamVirginiaMaj. Gen. HugerNov. 16, 1861.Nov. 16, 1861.Dec. 13, 1861, and Feb. 17, 1864. Promoted Major-General July 30, 1864; brigade composed of the 3d AlabNov. 16, 1861.Dec. 13, 1861, and Feb. 17, 1864. Promoted Major-General July 30, 1864; brigade composed of the 3d Alabama, the 6th, 12th, 16th and 41st Virginia and the 2d (afterwards 12th) North Carolina regiments, Anderson's division, A. P. Hill's corps, Army of Northern Virginia. 282Major, J. P.LouisianaGen. R. TaylorJuly 25, 1863.July 21, 1863.Feb. 17, 1864. 
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