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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
them, killing and wounding several of the enemy, and the reconnoissance having been completed the vessel returned to Cairo. The Taylor and Lexington were constantly employed on such service, and their value soon became apparent to the army officers, who had at first thought they would be of little use. Soon after the above mentioned reconnoissance. General Grant wrote to Commander Walke, requesting the services of the gun-boats to accompany him to Belmont landing, and on the 16th of November, 1861, the General started down the river with 3.100 men in transports, convoyed by the Taylor, Com. Walke, and the Lexington, Corn. R. N. Stembel. Grant landed his troops at Hunter's Point, on the Missouri side, out of range of the Columbus batteries, and marched direct on Belmont, three miles distant, where the Confederates had posted their camp in an open space protected by fallen timber. By nine o'clock Grant's entire command was hotly engaged, except one battalion left at the landi
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
nkful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, Pen. G. Watmough, Acting-Lieutenant-Commander. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. Respectfully forwarded, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer. Commendatory letter to Flag-officer Dupont. Navy Department, November 16, 1861. Sir-It is with no ordinary emotion that I tender to you and your command the heartfelt congratulations and thanks of the Government and the country for the brilliant success achieved at Port Royal. In the war now raging against the Government in this most causeless and unnatural rebellion that ever afflicted a country, high hopes have been indulged in the Navy, and great confidence reposed in its efforts. The results of the skill and bravery of yourself and others have equalled
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
nkful. Fortunately, the readiness of our medical officer, Mr. Perucer, was not called upon. Master's Mate Duncan, acting as gunner, provided a bountiful supply of ammunition for the battery. I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant, Pen. G. Watmough, Acting-Lieutenant-Commander. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont, Commanding South Atlantic Squadron. Respectfully forwarded, S. F. Dupont, Flag-Officer. Commendatory letter to Flag-officer Dupont. Navy Department, November 16, 1861. Sir-It is with no ordinary emotion that I tender to you and your command the heartfelt congratulations and thanks of the Government and the country for the brilliant success achieved at Port Royal. In the war now raging against the Government in this most causeless and unnatural rebellion that ever afflicted a country, high hopes have been indulged in the Navy, and great confidence reposed in its efforts. The results of the skill and bravery of yourself and others have equalled