Browsing named entities in Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight). You can also browse the collection for November 19th, 1861 AD or search for November 19th, 1861 AD in all documents.

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,523E. T. StarrSept. 14, 1858. 25,470J. RiderSept. 13, 1859. 26,362S. W. MarshDec. 9, 1859. *27,393C. M. SpencerMar. 6, 1860. 27,509N. L. BabcockMar. 20, 1860. 27,874G. P. FosterApr. 10, 1860. 33,317F. CurtisSept. 17, 1861. 33,745T. LeeNov. 19, 1861. 35,217C. C. ColemanMay 13, 1862. 35,354J. M. SeymourMay 20, 1862. 35,488J. C. CookeJune 3, 1862. *36,062C. M. SpencerJuly 29, 1862. 36,466F. W. HoweSept. 16, 1862. 37,501L. GeigerJan. 27, 1863. 38,042I. HartshornMar. 31, 1863. 39,1207T. BaileyJune 14, 1859. 26,504R. S. LawrenceDec. 20, 1859. *26,734T. P. GouldJan. 3, 1860. *28,646N. W. BrewerJune 12, 1860. 30,033E. AllenSept 18, 1860. *30,760J. S. ReederNov. 27, 1861. 33,607C. SharpsOct. 29, 1861. 33,769A. HamiltonNov. 19, 1861. 34,325G. W. WhiteFeb. 4, 1862. *34,504E. M. JuddFeb. 25, 1862. 35,686F. DewzlerApr. 29, 1862. 37,339G. W. WhiteJan. 6, 1863. 37,544J. DavisJan. 27, 1863. 33,455W. AldrichMay 12, 1863 *33,004W. H. RiceMay 19, 1863. 41,343Mix and Horto
rs, and are less successful than the Greeks. The Arabs employ sail-boats, carrying from four to seven men, one of whom acts as spearman, while the others manage the boat; they are less skillful and successful than either the Greeks or Sicilians. 2. Artificial sponge is made of caoutchouc by imbedding intimately and evenly throughout the plastic magma of gum some sugar or other granulated material, which may be subsequently dissolved, leaving the gum porous. No. 97,880, Chesterman, Nov. 19, 1861, uses golden sulphuret of antimony, and sets the rubber by vulcanizing it in its extended form. The ingredients are incorporated into a homogeneous mass on hot rollers and are afterward expanded and vulcanized. See also 94,631, Moulton, Sept. 7, 1869, for inking-rollers. Goodyear, No. 25,110, August 16, 1859, has a woven fabric with a thin, porous covering of caoutchouc: and No. 25,192, a porous fabric of woven cloth covered with gum and faced with flock. 3. (Ordnance.) A mop