Your search returned 83 results in 56 document sections:

1 2 3 4 5 6
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Confederate invasion of New Mexico and Arizona. (search)
our men wounded, he cowardly returned to the adobe walls of Fort Fillmore. On the morning of the 27th Lynde evacuated the fort without reason, and commenced a retreat for Fort Stanton, having about five hundred men. When near San Augustine Springs, Baylor appeared in his rear with less than three hundred men; and without a shot on either side Lynde surrendered his entire force, which consisted of seven companies of the 7th Regular Infantry and three companies of Mounted Rifles. On November 25th, 1861, for this conduct Major Lynde was dropped from the army. This action was revoked November 27th, 1866, by general orders, restoring him to his commission and placing him on the retired list of the army.--G. H. P. In the meantime, Fort Buchanan, situated near Tubac, and Fort Breckinridge, on the north side of the San Pedro River and above its confluence with the Gila, had been abandoned, and the troops ordered to Fort Fillmore. Upon reaching Cook's Cañon, this command, consisting
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
noon, a dense smoke arose from the village of Warrington, on the west of the Navy Yard, and at about the same time buildings in Wolcott, at the north of the yard, were in flames. These villages were fired by the missiles from the fort, and large portions of them, as well as of the Navy Yard, were laid in ashes. The bombardment was kept up until two o'clock the next morning, when it ceased. Report of Colonel Brown, November 24th, 1861; also of Commodore McKean to Secretary Welles, November 25th, 1861; report of General Bragg to Samuel Cooper, November 27th, 1861. After this bombardment of two days, there was quiet on Pensacola Bay until the first day of the year, January 1, 1862. when another artillery duel occurred, lasting nearly twelve hours, but doing very little damage to either party. Looking farther westward, along the Gulf of Mexico, we observe little sparks of war threatening a conflagration at several points, at about the time when the events we have just conside
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 33: (search)
nks for their untiring labors while we were in danger, and their unceasing kindness since we have been on board the frigate. This report is respectfully submitted. I am, Commodore, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John Geo. Reynolds, Commanding Battalion Marines, Southern Division. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding United States Naval Expedition, Southern Coast, U. S. N. America. The capture of Tybee Island, Georgia. Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 25, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to inform the Department that the flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. As soon as the serious injury to the boilers of the Flag had been repaired, I dispatched Commander John Rodgers to Tybee entrance, the mouth of Savannah River, to report to Commander Missroon, the senior officer, for a preliminary examination of the bars, and for the determination of the most suitable place for sinking the proposed obstructions t
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Letters relating to the battle of Port Royal and occupation of the Confederate forts. (search)
nks for their untiring labors while we were in danger, and their unceasing kindness since we have been on board the frigate. This report is respectfully submitted. I am, Commodore, very respectfully, your obedient servant, John Geo. Reynolds, Commanding Battalion Marines, Southern Division. Flag-Officer Samuel F. Dupont, Commanding United States Naval Expedition, Southern Coast, U. S. N. America. The capture of Tybee Island, Georgia. Flag-Ship Wabash, Port Royal Harbor, Nov. 25, 1861. Sir — I have the honor to inform the Department that the flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. As soon as the serious injury to the boilers of the Flag had been repaired, I dispatched Commander John Rodgers to Tybee entrance, the mouth of Savannah River, to report to Commander Missroon, the senior officer, for a preliminary examination of the bars, and for the determination of the most suitable place for sinking the proposed obstructions t
Doc. 189. occupation of Tybee Island, November 24, 1861. Flag-officer Dupont's report. flag-ship Wabash, Port Royal harbor, S. C., Nov. 25, 1861. sir: I have the honor to inform the department that the flag of the United States is flying over the territory of the State of Georgia. As soon as the serious injury to the boilers of the Flag had been repaired, I despatched Commander John Rodgers to Tybee entrance, the mouth of Savannah River, to report to Commander Missroon, the senouthern coast from our success at Port Royal is intense and all-pervading. Savannah is nearly depopulated, and the trains go loaded with household and every description of goods, including negroes. Secession account. Fort Pulaski, November 25, 1861. I suppose you have heard of affairs down here before this. The enemy appeared around Tybee point about eleven o'clock A. M. yesterday. The sentinel reported them, and the assembly was beat; we were ordered to the guns; there we awaited
c. 191. the fight at Fort Pickens. Colonel Brown's report. Headquarters Department of Florida, Fort Pickens, Nov. 25, 1861. General: That Fort Pickens has been beleagured by the rebels for the last nine months, and that it was daily threng. Brig.-Gen. L. Thomas, Adjt.-Gen. U. S. Army, Washington, D. C. Headquarters Department of Florida, Fort Pickens, Nov. 25, 1861. General: The bombardment of the 22d and 23d has elicited some facts that are of importance, and I notice them thaconclusion of the official report of Colonel Harvey Brown: Headquarters, Department of Florida, Fort Pickens, November 25, 1861. General: It is with much pain that, after the wonderful escape of my command from the missiles of the enemy, I ngratulatory order of Gen. Bragg. General order no. 130: Headquarters army of Pensacola, Near Pensacola, Fla., Nov. 25, 1861. The signal success which has crowned our forty hours conflict with the arrogant and confident enemy — whose gover
Doc. 192 1/2. the campaign in Missouri. Rebel official report. Richmond, Nov. 25, 1861. To Colonel J. R. Purvis, Assistant Adjutant-General, Missouri State Guard: Colonel: My absence from Missouri on business connected with our State interest prevented my receiving until to-day your report of the 28th ult. During my superintendence, under Gov. Jackson's authority, of the affairs of our suffering State in its southern quarter, nothing has occurred to give me such satisfaction as the perusal of your account of General Thompson's short but brilliant campaign in the Ozark Mountains. To have ventured to advance more than one hundred miles from the main body of our forces, pass between the strongly garrisoned fortresses of the enemy at Ironton and Cape Girardeau, distant only a few hours' travel — the former by railroad and the latter by the Mississippi River--from St. Louis, and burn an important railroad bridge within fifty miles of that city, swarming with Lincoln troops,
Doc. 201. reconnoissance at Port Royal. Commander Drayton's report. United States steamer Pawnee, Port Royal harbor, Nov. 25, 1861. Flag-Officer S. F. Dupont: sir: In obedience to instructions contained in your letter of the 24th instant, I left this harbor at three A. M. of the 25th inst., in company with the Unadilla, Lieutenant Commanding Collins, and the Pembina, Lieutenant Commanding Bankhead, piloted by the Vixen, Captain Boutelle. We crossed this bar at half-past 4, and that of St. Helena at half-past 9--a steamer, supposed to be the General Clinch, being then off the Edisto River, which position she shortly left, and steamed up the river. I soon afterward came in sight of a fort on the point of Otter Island, into which, at the distance of a mile, I threw a few shells, as did the gunboats, to discover if it were occupied. There being no answer, I sent a boat on shore to take possession, and found it to be a regular triangular work, with two faces toward the w
doubtless think it a great outrage upon their neutrality, but they will have to pocket this, as I have been as forbearing as they can expect, and nothing but the feeling of the impolicy of bringing on hostilities between my country and France, makes me submit with any thing like grace. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, James S. Palmer, Com'g. Hon. Gideon Welles, Sec'y of the Navy, Washington, D. C. United States steamship Iroquois, St. Thomas, W. I., Nov. 25, 1861. sir: As I expected, I have to report the escape of the Sumter, to the great dejection of us all, for never were officers and crew more zealous for a capture. At eight o'clock on the night of the 23d, the signal was faithfully made us from the shore, that the Sumter had shipped to the southward. Instantly we were off in pursuit, soon at full speed, rushing down to the southern part of the bay, but nothing was visible on the dark background. A small steamer, apparently one plyin
's brigades. A third brigade added early in October. Sept. 16, 1861: McCall's division; on the 25th of that month he received the last two regiments of the Pennsylvania Reserves, so that his division consisted of thirteen regiments in three brigades, under Meade, J. F. Reynolds, and Ord. Sept. 28, 1861: W. F. Smith's division, consisting of the Vermont brigade (afterwards Brooks's), J. J. Stevens's and Hancock's brigades. Oct. 5, 1861: Heintzelman's division, consisting of Richardson's, Sedgwick's, and Jameson's brigades. Oct. 11, 1861: Hooker's division, consisting of his own (afterwards Naglee's) brigade and Sickles's brigade. In November a third brigade (Starr's New Jersey) was added. Oct. 12, 1861: Blenker's division, consisting of Stahl's and Steinwehr's brigades. A third brigade added during the winter. Nov. 25, 1861: Sumner's division, consisting of Howard's, Meagher's, and French's brigades. Dec. 6, 1861: Casey's division, consisting of three brigades.
1 2 3 4 5 6