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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 174 174 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 6 6 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 4 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for December, 1861 AD or search for December, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 3: closing of Southern ports.--increase of the Navy.--list of vessels and their stations.--purchased vessels.--vessels constructing, etc. (search)
f Brazil: Name. Class. No. of Guns. Date of Arrival. Congress Frigate 50 August 12. Seminole Steam Sloop 5 July 6. The following had not arrived, Dec., 1861. From East Indies: Name. Class. No. of Guns.   John Adams Sloop 20   Hartford Steam Sloop 16   Dacotah Steam Sloop 6   The following were tking a total of 264 vessels, 2,557 guns, and 218,016 tons. The aggregate number of seamen in the service on the 4th of March, 1861, was 7,600. The number in December, 1861, was not less than 22,000. This was a very good exhibit for the Navy in less than a year after the commencement of the war, but it must be remembered that faculties to feed them. One of the acts of the new Secretary of the Navy was to recommend a reorganization of the service to increase its efficiency. In December, 1861, Mr. Secretary Welles recommended that the permanent organization of the line officers of the Navy should be as follows, adding three grades to the number the
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. (search)
Chapter 22: operations in the Potomac.--destruction of Confederate batteries.--losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc. The Potomac flotilla. naval operations in the Potomac. destruction of Confederate batteries. Confederate rams. condition of the Navy, and list of vessels in December, 1862. losses by shipwreck, in battle, etc., etc. On the Potomac, the flotilla seems to have been actively employed from December, 1861, to May 2d, 1862. Although no important event occurred on this water highway to Washington, early in the war the Confederates left nothing undone to stop the passage of transports, and even men-of-war, but they were not very successful. Cockpit Point was one of the places made quite strong by the enemy, and for a time it was considered quite a dangerous place to pass. No persistent attack was made upon it until March, 1862, and as our Army was advancing into Virginia at the same time, the Confederates were now compelled to abandon this troublesome b