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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 174 174 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 15 15 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 10 10 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 9 9 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 7 7 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 7 7 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 6 6 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 4 4 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: December 20, 1860., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for December, 1861 AD or search for December, 1861 AD in all documents.

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from Tennessee, discusses the question of secession in a letter to the Nashville Union. He admits the probability of a dissolution of the Union by the 4th of March, regarding it as certain that South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi will have seceded before that time. He then proceeds to show that on the 4th of March, 1861, when the new administration is installed, the majority of the Senate will belong to the party which elected Mr. Lincoln. On the first Monday in December, 1861, when the next Congress meets, the Republican party will, in all probability, have a majority in both Houses of Congress. --This result will have been produced by the secessions of the cotton States. In view of these facts, the action of the middle and border Southern States becomes, in the opinion of Mr. Nicholson, a momentous subject for consideration. He contends that the influence of these States should be so exerted as to prevent a collision between the seceding States and the