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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 3 3 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 1 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Seacoast defences of South Carolina and Georgia. (search)
thwestern extremity of Beaufort island, followed the capture of Port Royal. This exposed Savannah, only about twenty-five miles distant, to an attack from that direction. At the same time, the Federals having command of Helena bay, Charleston was liable to be assailed from north Edisto or Stono inlet, and the railroad could have been reached without opposition by the road from Port Royal to Pocotaligo. Such was the state of affairs when General Lee reached Charleston, about the first of December, 1861, to assume the command of the departments of North Carolina, Georgia and Florida. His vigorous mind at once comprehended the situation, and with his accustomed energy he met the difficulties that presented themselves. Directing fortifications to be constructed on the Stono and the Edisto and the Combahee, he fixed his headquarters at Coosawhatchie, the point most threatened, and directed defences to be erected opposite Hilton Head, and on the Broad and Saltcatchie, to cover Savanna
overboard.--New York Times, November 16. Lieut. H. C. Bull, of the Ninth Iowa regiment, with fifteen men, went from Camp Herron, Mo., to Manchester, twenty miles distant, and captured a large secession flag.--(Doc. 165.) The Norfolk Day Book. of to-day, contains the following notice: Plans and offers for the construction of four seagoing, iron-clad, and ball-proof steam ram-ships, to carry at least four heavy guns each, are invited by the Navy Department, up to the 1st of December, 1861. Parties making offers are requested to accompany their plans by descriptive drawings and specifications; and a proper compensation for the labor of preparing such plans and drawings as may be submitted will be made by the Department. S. R. Mallory, Secretary of the Navy. Ford's Ferry, eight miles below Caseyville, Ky., was visited by one hundred rebel cavalry, under command of the notorious Capt. Wilcox, who was supposed to have been killed in the skirmish at Saratoga, Ky. T
gitive slaves ? Plainly, by the color of their skins, and that only. The sole end of this regulation was the remanding of all slaves to their masters--seven-eighths of whom were most envenomed, implacable Rebels--by depriving them of refuge within our lines from those masters' power. Gen. Camera, the Secretary of War, had already become an ardent and open convert to the policy of recognizing Slavery as the Union's real assailant, and fighting her accordingly. In his Annual Report Dec. 1, 1861. to the President of the operations of his Department, he said: It has become a grave question for determination what shall be done with the slaves abandoned by their owners on the advance of our troops into Southern territory, as in the Beanfort district of South Carolina. The whole White population therein is six thousand, while the number of negroes exceeds thirty-two thousand. The panic which drove their masters in wild confusion from their homes leaves them in undisputed posses
d Staff 2   2 1 1 2 18 Company A 1 14 15   8 8 184   B   13 13   16 16 186   C   23 23   15 15 184   D   8 8   5 5 187   E   20 20   8 8 185   F   10 10   22 22 174   G 1 18 19   8 8 178   H 1 10 11 1 11 12 141   I   11 11 1 13 14 177   K 2 24 26   12 12 198 Totals 7 151 158 3 119 122 1,812 Total of killed and wounded, 562. battles. K. & M. W. battles. K. & M. W. Cheat Mountain, W. Va., Sept. 12, 1861 2 Scout, Aug. 1, 1863 1 Grafton, W. Va., Dec. 1, 1861 1 Honey Hill, S. C. 35 Camp Allegheny, W. Va., Dec. 13, 1861 11 Deveaux Neck, S. C. 6 Baldwin's Creek, W. Va., Dec. 31, 1861 3 Judson Hill, S. C. 1 McDowell, Va., May 8, 1862 12 Red Hill, S. C. 1 Cross Keys, Va. 10 Combahee Ferry, S. C. 2 Manassas, Va. 16 Guerillas 1 Chancellorsville, Va. 30 Place unknown 1 Gettysburg, Pa. 25     Present, also, at Green Brier, W. Va.; Huntersville, Va.; Monterey, Va.; Freeman's Ford, Va.; Hagerstown, Md.; Sieg
Doc. 223. Gen. Hunter and Si Gordon. Gen. Hunter's proclamation. Headquarters Department of Kansas, Fort Leavenworth, Dec. 1, 1861. To the Trustees of Platte City, Platte Co., Mo.: Gentlemen: Having received reliable information of depredations and outrages of every kind committed by a man named Si Gordon, a leader of rebel marauding bands, I give you notice that unless you seize and deliver the said Gordon to me at these Headquarters, within ten days from this date, or drive him out of the county, I shall send a force to your city with orders to reduce it to ashes, and to burn the house of every secessionist in your county, and to carry away every slave. Col. Jennison's regiment will be entrusted with the execution of this order. The following persons are particularly directed to this notice:--David Hunt, Clinton Cockerill, James Merryman, Robert Cain, John Murray, H. T. Freeland, William Paxton, W. C. Bemington, Andrew Tribble, R. P. S. Ely, Jackson Miller, Robert C
the southwestern extremity of Beaufort Island, followed the capture of Port Royal. This exposed Savannah, only about twentyfive miles distant, to an attack from that direction. At the same time, the Federals having command of Helena Bay, Charleston was liable to be assailed from North Edisto or Stono Inlet, and the railroad could have been reached without opposition by the route from Port Royal to Pocotaligo. Such was the state of affairs when General Lee reached Charleston, about December 1, 1861, to assume the command of the Department of North Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. His vigorous mind at once comprehended the situation, and, with his accustomed energy, he met the difficulties that presented themselves. Directing fortifications to be constructed on the Stono and the Edisto and the Combahee, he fixed his headquarters at Coosawhatchee, the point most threatened, and directed defenses to be erected opposite Hilton Head, and on the Broad and Saltehatchie, to cover Savann
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Kentucky, 1861 (search)
rmish, Brownsville(No Reports.) Nov. 24-Dec. 5: Exp. from Columbus to CaseyvilleMISSOURI--8th Infantry (3 Cos.). Dec. 1-13: Operations about Mill Springs and SomersetINDIANA--33d Infantry. KENTUCKY--12th Infantry. OHIO--17th and 35th Infantry. Dec. 1: Demonstration on Fort HoltILLINOIS--Battery "A," 1st Light Arty. Dec. 1: Skirmish, Whippoorwill CreekKENTUCKY--26th Infantry. Dec. 1-2: Skirmishes, Goggin's CampConfederate reports. Dec. 4-7: Expedition to Bacon Creek BridgeConfederate reportDec. 1: Skirmish, Whippoorwill CreekKENTUCKY--26th Infantry. Dec. 1-2: Skirmishes, Goggin's CampConfederate reports. Dec. 4-7: Expedition to Bacon Creek BridgeConfederate reports. Dec. 5-8: Scout to RussellvilleConfederate reports. Dec. 8: Skirmish. Fishing Creek near SomersetOHIO--35th Infantry. Union loss, 1 killed, 1 wounded, 15 missing. Total, 17. Dec. 8: Skirmish, Fishing CreekKENTUCKY--1st Cavalry. Dec. 12: Skirmish, GradysvilleKENTUCKY--5th Cavalry. Dec. 12: Skirmish, Bagdad, Shelby CoKENTUCKY--6th Infantry. Union loss, 1 wounded. Dec. 17: Action, Rowlett's StationINDIANA--32d Infantry. Union loss, 10 killed, 22 wounded. Total, 32. Dec. 18: Reconn. to Mil
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Missouri, 1861 (search)
nta FeKANSAS--7th Cavalry. Nov. 21: Affair at WarsawDestruction of U. S. Stores. Nov. 24: Skirmish, LancasterMISSOURI--21st Infantry. Union loss, 1 killed, 2 wounded. Total, 3. Nov. 24: Skirmish, JohnstownMISSOURI--Cass County Home Guard Cavalry. Nov. 26: Skirmish, Independence, Little BlueKANSAS--7th Cavalry. Nov. 29: Skirmish, Black Walnut Creek, SedaliaMISSOURI--4th Cavalry (Detachment). Union loss, 15 wounded. Nov. 30: Skirmish, Grand RiverMISSOURI--Cass County Home Guard Cavalry. Dec. 1: Skirmish, ShanghaiOHIO--39th Infantry. Dec. 8: Skirmish, SalemMISSOURI--Bowen's Battalion Cavalry. Union loss, 4 killed, 8 wounded. Total, 12. Dec. 3-12: Scout through Saline CountyMISSOURI--2d Cavalry. UNITED STATES--Detachment of Cavalry. Union loss, 6 killed, 10 wounded. Total, 16. Dec. 4: Skirmish, DunksburgCitizens. Dec. 5-9: Expedition through Current HillsMISSOURI--Bowen's 1st Battalion Cavalry. Dec. 9: Skirmish, Union Mills(No Reports.) Dec. 11: Skirmish, BertrandILLINOIS--2d
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Indiana Volunteers. (search)
oburn's Brigade, Post of Murfreesboro, Tenn., Dept. of the Cumberland, to January, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 1st Division, 11th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 3rd Division, 20th Army Corps, Army of the Cumberland, to July, 1865. Service. Moved to Camp Wild Cat, Ky., October 13, 1861. Action at Camp Wild Cat, Rockcastle Hills, October 21. At Crab Orchard, Ky., November 15, 1861, to January 3, 1862. Operations about Mill Springs, Somerset, Ky., December 1-13, 1861. At Lexington, Ky., January 3 to April 11, 1862. Cumberland Gap Campaign March 28-June 18. Occupation of Cumberland Gap June 18 to September 17. Retreat to the Ohio River September 17-October 3. Duty at Covington, Lexington, Nicholasville and Danville, Ky., till January 26, 1863. Moved to Louisville, Ky., thence to Nashville, Tenn., January 26-February 7. Moved to Franklin February 21. Action at Franklin March 4. Battle of Thompson's Station March 4-5.
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Kentucky Volunteers. (search)
on, 23rd Army Corps, to April, 1864. 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, District of Kentucky, 5th Division, 23rd Army Corps, to December, 1864. 1st Brigade, 2nd Division, 23rd Army Corps, Army of Ohio, to February, 1865, and Dept. of North Carolina to July, 1865. Service. Action at Woodbury, Ky., October 29, 1861. Morgantown, Ky., October 31, 1861. Moved from Owensboro to Calhoun, Ky., November, 1861, and duty there till February, 1862. Action at Whippoor — will Creek, Ky., December 1, 1861. Moved to South Carrollton, thence to Calhoun, Owensboro and Nashville, Tenn., February, 1862. March to Savannah, Tenn., March 17-April 6. Battle of Shiloh, Tenn., April 7. Advance on and siege of Corinth, Miss., April 29-May 30. Buell's Campaign in Northern Alabama and Middle Tennessee June to August. March to Nashville, Tenn., thence to Louisville, Ky., in pursuit of Bragg August 21-September 26. Pursuit of Bragg into Kentucky October 1-22. Battle of Perryville
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