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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 7 7 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 5 5 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 3 3 Browse Search
Benjamin Cutter, William R. Cutter, History of the town of Arlington, Massachusetts, ormerly the second precinct in Cambridge, or District of Menotomy, afterward the town of West Cambridge. 1635-1879 with a genealogical register of the inhabitants of the precinct. 2 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 1 1 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1863., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.). You can also browse the collection for December 1st, 1861 AD or search for December 1st, 1861 AD in all documents.

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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.), Book III:—the first conflict. (search)
substituted for boats, but were rejected by the army of the Potomac, as they were too easily torn. The materials most generally in use were either simple wooden barges that could easily be repaired or tubular pontons of sheet iron, which had the advantage of being much lighter. It will be enough to mention the regulation ration of the American soldier to convey an idea of the importance of the subsistence department, whose duty it was to provide food for the armies, which on the 1st of December, 1861, numbered six hundred thousand men. To the commissary of subsistence there were no dead-heads (non-valeurs). All those who were prevented by special assignment from appearing on the field of battle, and whom the general must deduct from his fighting force, seated themselves in the evening with the rest around the mess-table, which the commissary had to supply. One pound of biscuit or twenty-two ounces of bread or flour, one pound and a quarter of fresh or salt beef or three-quarters