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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 5 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 11, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: December 5, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Rev. James K. Ewer , Company 3, Third Mass. Cav., Roster of the Third Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment in the war for the Union 2 2 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for December 4th, 1861 AD or search for December 4th, 1861 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 5 document sections:

Doc. 210. Mr. Saulsbury's resolutions. Offered in the U. S. Senate, Dec. 4, 1861. Whereas, the people of the States of Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, Florida, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Texas, Arkansas and Tennessee, are in revolt against the Constitutional Government of the United States, and have assumed to secede from the Federal Union, to form an independent Government, under the name of the Confederate States of America; and Whereas, the Congress of the United States, approving the sentiments of the President in his annual message, that the Union must be preserved, and hence all indispensable means must be employed; and believing that kind and fraternal feeling between the people of all the States is indispensable to the maintenance of a happy and prosperous Union, and being willing to manifest such feeling on their part to them, and that pence may be restored to a distracted country, and the Union and Constitution be preserved and maintained, a
Doc. 211. Gen. Phelps' proclamation. Headquarters Middlesex Brigade, ship Island, Mississippi, December 4, 1861. To the loyal citizens of the Southwest: Without any desire of my own, but contrary to my private inclinations, I again find myself among you as a military officer of the Government. A proper respect for my fellow-country-men renders it not out of place that I should make known to you the motives and principles by which my command will be governed. We believe that every State that has been admitted as a slave State into the Union since the adoption of the Constitution, has been admitted in direct violation of that Constitution. We believe that the slave States which existed, as such, at the adoption of our Constitution, are, by becoming parties to that compact, under the highest obligations of honor and morality to abolish slavery. It is our conviction that monopolies are as destructive, as competition is conservative of the principles and vitalities of r
Doc. 212. affair at Whippoorwill Bridge, Ky. December 4, 1861. The Louisville-Nashville Courier, of the 9th of December, gives the following details of the bridge-burning affair at Whippoorwill: A detachment of fifteen had been stationed at the bridge to guard it, of whom two were absent at the time of the attack. The Federals, fifty or sixty in number, under command of a Dutch Jew peddler named Netter, and among whom were several who had been raised in the neighborhood, made their appearance about daybreak Thursday morning. Four of the guard, who were on duty, and who were standing by a plank cabin, fired upon them, whereupon they received a volley of over one hundred rounds from Sharp's revolving rifles, killing two instantly and wounding another. Most of the shots were fired into the cabin, on the supposition that the rest of the guard were asleep in it, but fortunately they were in a cabin a little distance off. They were aroused by the firing, but by the time they wer
Doc. 213. Secretary Seward's letter. Contrabands in District of Columbia. Department of State, Washington City, December 4, 1861. To Major-General George B. McClellan, Washington: General: I am directed by the President to call your attention to the following subject: Persons claimed to be held to service or labor under the laws of the State of Virginia, and actually employed in hostile service against the Government of the United States, frequently escape from the lines of the enemy's forces and are received within the lines of the army of the Potomac. This Department understands that such persons, afterward coming into the city of Washington, are liable to be arrested by the city police, upon presumption, arising from color, that they are fugitives from service or labor. By the fourth section of the act of Congress approved August 6th, 1861, entitled An Act to confiscate property used for insurrectionary purposes, such hostile employment is made a full and sufficien
Doc. 215. movements near Port Royal, S. C. December 4-6, 1861. Reports of Commodore Dupont. flagship Wabash, Port Royal harbor, S. C., December 4, 1861. sir: The apprehension of losing possession of the Bay of St. Helena, so exceedingly valuable for a harbor, for its proximity to Charleston, and for the command it secures of large rivers supplying interior communication with the State of South Carolina, has induced me to despatch a second expedition there, under Commander Drayton, December 4, 1861. sir: The apprehension of losing possession of the Bay of St. Helena, so exceedingly valuable for a harbor, for its proximity to Charleston, and for the command it secures of large rivers supplying interior communication with the State of South Carolina, has induced me to despatch a second expedition there, under Commander Drayton, with orders to hold the island until Gen. Sherman is prepared to assume military occupation of it, when he will transfer the fort to his troops. I have also despatched Commander C. R. P. Rogers to make a reconnoissance of Warsaw Inlet, in order to ascertain the position and force of the enemy's battery there — information which the Commanding-General has expressed to me is his desire to obtain before landing troops on Tybee Island. The department will have the goodness to observe that, in