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Legislature of Virginia.Senate. Monday, Dec. 9, 1861. The Senate was called to order by Mr. Johnson, of Bedford, who submitted the following letter from the President: Richmond, Dec. 8, 1861. To the Members of the Senate of Virginia: Gentlemen — I have just received by telegraph the painful intelligence of the death of one of my children. This sad event renders it necessary for me to be absent for some days. You will, therefore, take such measures to secure a presiding officer during my absence as shall seem to you best. Very truly your friend and obedient servant, Ro. L. Montague. Resolutions of inquiry. By Mr. McKenney.--Of creating the office of Leather Inspector for the city of Norfolk. By Mr. Thompson.--Of providing additional room for the storage of tobacco. By Mr. Neeson.--Of extending the period for the organization of the Virginia Canal Company. By Mr. Wiley.--Of so amending the existing law in relation to the issue of
The Daily Dispatch: December 12, 1861., [Electronic resource], The 56th regiment Virginia volunteers. (search)
The 56th regiment Virginia volunteers. Abingdon, Va. Dec. 08, 1861. Editors Dispatch: The 56th regiment of Virginia volunteers arrived at this place on the 26th of November, after a long and tedious journey from Richmond. Since its arrival here our men have been treated with the greatest kindness and hospitality by the citizens. This is an old village, beautifully situated, and surrounded on all sides by the grandest and most gorgeous mountain scenery. Provisions are plentiful, and the men are greatly pleased with this section of the State. This regiment, I believe, is the only one in the service which selected its own field officers and for the information of these who have friends and relations with us, I will name the various officers connected with the regiment. Colonel W. D. Stuart, of Richmond; Lt. Col. P. Slaughter, of Orange; Major W E. Green, of Charlotte; Co. A, Capt. Boswell. Mecklenburg; Co. B, Capt. G W Davis, Mecklenburg; Co C. Capt. T. Smith
Army of the Potomac. [our own Correspondent.] Outposts, (Near Fairfax,) Dec. 8th, 1861. Still everything is quiet on the outposts, and there are no signs of any advance on the part of the enemy. The weather continues fine, and the roads as good as they ever are either in summer or winter. No objections could now be offered for not fighting, on the score of had roads, for they are in excellent condition for the use of artillery and for the transportation of army stores. As there is nothing in the shape of war matters to employ my pen, I will give you the story of Redmond Burke, the Scout, who was captured by the Federals at the battle of Lewinsville, and recently escaped from their clutches by scaling the walls of the jail in Washington. While Gen. J. E. B. Stuart, then Col. Stuart of the 1st Virginia Cavalry, was in the army of the Shenandoah, he was joined by Burke and his two sons, all of whom enlisted in the cavalry; but the elder was retained as special esc
munication which you have made to me. I will, also, without delay, do myself the honor to confer with you personally on the arrangements to be made for delivering the four gentlemen to me, in order that they may again be placed under the protection of the British flag. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient humble servant, Lyons. M. Thouvenil to M. Mercier.(Translation) Administration of Foreign Affairs, Political Departm't, Paris Dec. 8, 1861. Sir: The arrest of Messieurs Mason and Slidell on board of the English packet Trent by an American cruiser, has produced in France, if not the same emotion as in England, at least extreme astonishment and sensation. Public sentiment was at once engrossed with the lawfulness and the consequence of such an act, and the impression which has resulted from this has not been for an instant doubtful. The fact has appeared so much out of accordance with the ordinary rules of internat
munication which you have made to me. I will, also, without delay, do myself the honor to confer with you personally on the arrangements to be made for delivering the four gentlemen to me, in order that they may again be placed under the protection of the British flag. I have the honor to be, with the highest consideration, sir, your most obedient humble servant, Lyons. M. Thouvenil to M. Mercier.(Translation) Administration of Foreign Affairs, Political Departm't, Paris Dec. 8, 1861. Sir: The arrest of Messieurs Mason and Slidell on board of the English packet Trent by an American cruiser, has produced in France, if not the same emotion as in England, at least extreme astonishment and sensation. Public sentiment was at once engrossed with the lawfulness and the consequence of such an act, and the impression which has resulted from this has not been for an instant doubtful. The fact has appeared so much out of accordance with the ordinary rules of internat
Notice --Was committed to the jail of Bedford county on the 8d of December, 1861, a Negro Man, who calls himself Isaac Rixby, and says he is the property of Daniel Hunt, of Richmond, Va. Said negro is of a ginger-bread color, about 23 years old 6 feet high, with a good set of teeth; no scars, except on the back, from whipping; and had on, when committed a suit of dark-colored domestic cloth, very much worn, and ragged. The owner of said negro is requested to come forward, prove property, pay charges, and take him away; otherwise he will be dealt with as the law directs. Wm H. Pate, ja 14--lm Sheriff Bedford County.
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