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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 217. affair near Williamsport, Md. (search)
Doc. 217. affair near Williamsport, Md. Captain Robinson's official report. Headquarters Co. D, First Reg. Va. Brigade, U. S. Volunteers, Four Locks, near Williamsport, Md., Dec. 9, 1861. Col. S. H. Leonard, Commanding Williamsport and Vicinity, Md.: sir: I have the honor to report that, on Friday afternoon, the 6th inst., my pickets at Dam No. 5 and Back Creek were fired on by the enemy, by cavalry at the former place, and infantry at the latter. The sergeants in charge of each of those pickets immediately communicated with me here, and I despatched reinforcements to both places; but after some shots had been exchanged all remained quiet during the remainder of that day and night. The sergeant at dam No. 5 reported three wounded on the side of the enemy, but none of our men were hurt at either place. On Saturday afternoon, about half-past 3 o'clock P. M., I was apprised of the advance of the enemy in strong force in the direction of Dam No. 5. I immediately took my
Doc. 218. a fight on the lower Potomac. Lieut. Wyman's report. United States steamer Harriet Lane, off Mattawoman Creek, December 9, 1861. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: Sir: I have the honor to report to you that this morning, about half-past 9 o'clock, seeing the enemy's pickets, three camp wagons, and a mounted officer coming down the road to the southward of Freestone Point, and halting at some buildings near the beach, I directed the steamers Jacob Bell and Anacostible. The enemy fired but a few musket shot. I am, very respectfully, &c., R. H. Wyman, U. S. N., Lieutenant-Commanding Potomac Flotilla. The correspondent with General Hooker's Division, near Budd's Ferry, says of this affair: December 9, 1861. The lower Potomac was enlivened this morning by the gunboats of the upper flotilla shelling the woods and burning the buildings at Freestone Point, while about the same time there was a fine review of New Jersey troops on the Maryland si
Doc. 219. Gov. Pickens' proclamation, calling for Volunteers. State of South Carolina, Headquarters, Dec. 9, 1861. Our State is invaded, and Charleston is threatened, by land and by sea, with large forces. I, therefore, in conformity with an act passed the 7th inst., entitled An Act to annul and suspend certain portions of the Militia and Patrol Laws of this State, do hereby issue this, my proclamation, calling for twelve thousand volunteers, to be furnished for a term of service nothe provisions of said Act. For further particulars, special reference is hereby made to the order of the Adjutant and Inspector-General. F. W. Pickens. State of South Carolina, Headquarters, Adjutant and Inspector-General's office, Columbia, Dec. 9, 1861. General Orders No. 121: In accordance with the proclamation of His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief, and under the provisions of the Act of the General Assembly, entitled An Act to suspend and amend certain portions of the Militia and Pat
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 221. Ashepoo River expedition. (search)
Doc. 221. Ashepoo River expedition. Commander Drayton's report. United States steamer Pawnee, Port Royal harbor, Dec. 9, 1861. sir: In obedience to your order of the 4th instant, I proceeded to sea at daylight of the 5th, accompanied by the gunboat Unadilla, Lieutenant-Commanding N. Collins; steamer Isaac Smith, Lieutenant-Commanding Nicholson, and coast survey steamer Vixen, Captain Boutelle, and reached anchorage off the fort on Otter Island, St. Helena Sound, at mid-day. In the course of the afternoon, some negroes coming on board, and reporting that there was a body of soldiers at the entrance of Mosquito Creek, a place up Ashepoo, where the inland route to Charleston commences, I proceeded as far as that place, when night coming on, obliged me to return. I saw, however, no signs of the presence of white people, excepting that some buildings, which I discovered next day to have been on Hutchinson's Island, were burning. On the morning of the 6th, the United States