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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First iron-clad Monitor. (search)
y the Navy Department to Mr. Griswold and his associates, as rapidly, at least, as the work progressed, and was certified to by the supervising agent of the Department; there being an interval of only fifteen or twenty days between each payment, as will be seen by the following from the official record: 1861.-November 15, first payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent$37,500 December 3, second payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 December 17, third payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 1862.-January 3, fourth payment, $50,000, less 25 per cent37,500 February 6, fifth payment, $50,000, less 25 cent37,500 March 3, sixth payment, $25,000, less 25 per cent18,750 March 14, last payment, reservations68,750 Total$275,000 Save reservations, which were made in all cases of vessels built by contract, the last payment, on the completion of the battery, was on the 3d of March, and, as time was precious and pressing, she was hastily commissioned, officered, manned, supplied, and lef
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), General Reynolds' last battle. (search)
master of the art of war, and rapidly rising to the height of every new command, of every novel duty, of every fresh demand upon his military skill and resources. It was his brigade that first smelled powder at Drainesville; it was his division that made the stoutest resistance on the Peninsula, and his imprisonment at Richmond after his capture, ended only in time to find him sent to Pennsylvania to organize and command the hasty levies of militiamen, brought together to resist the raid of 1862. He thoroughly inspired his subordinates with his own zeal, and the men who served under him felt that unconscious and irresistible strength, which comes from a commander fully competent to his work, ready to do it with whatever forces are given him, and able to command success from every opportunity. That task done, he led the division which, at the second Bull Run, held its own against overwhelming odds, and helped to save the army. His corps won the only success at Fredericksburg, and i
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The battle of Beverly ford. (search)
an say of the expedition, as to its futility, barrenness and general worthlessness, of which we were conscious and heartily tired long before we saw the end of it. The battle of Beverly Ford, as we call it, or of Fleetwood, as General Stuart styled it, is interesting in the first place, because it was the first occasion when the cavalry of the Army of the Potomac went into action as a body. The cavalry had been organized by General Hooker into a corps under Stoneman during the winter of 1862-63, and Stoneman had commanded the greater part of it as a unit in the field during his celebrated but entirely fruitless raid in the Chancellorsville campaign; but there had been no fighting-simply long marches in rain and mud, and much loss of sleep. General Stoneman, naturally of an anxious habit of mind, was unfitted by temperament, as well as by bodily suffering, for independent operations remote from the main army. After the return from the raid he was unjustly held to blame for a sha
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), War as a popular Educator. (search)
loved. The churches are crowded with thoughtful worshipers, prayers are earnest; there is something to pray for. It is a test of the God they worship — the deliverance of the Israelites from bondage is in their minds, and when the cloud is darkest they see light through the darkness. The people are in deep earnest, every power is strained. What a change one year has produced. The real condition of the people before the war will be, perhaps, as well understood by the contrast with that of 1862 and succeeding years. That this war has produced like effects with all other wars of principle is unquestioned. The people of this country lived a century in the four years of war. The realities of life with its probabilities were taught them by a new teacher. They learned the value of a stable government, the necessity that in its Constitution there must exist all power to perpetuate and preserve its life; that this continent can only be developed under a strong government, and made a saf
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Fire, sword, and the halter. (search)
Fire, sword, and the halter. General J. D. Imboden. The years 1862 and 1864 were the most eventful of the war in the Shenandoah Valley. During the spring of the first, Stonewall Jackson made his famous twenty-eight days campaign, with 13,000 men, against Generals Milroy, Banks, Fremont and Shields, driving them all out of the valley, with their aggregate forces of about 64,000 men. In 1864 the Federal operations were conducted successively by Generals Sigel, Hunter and Sheridan, when thatd of The Valley District, in Virginia. The district embraced all that part of Virginia west of the Blue Ridge Mountain, and so far to the southwest as the James river, in Bottetourt county. It was created as a separate territorial command in 1861-2, for General Jackson, and continued as such after his death up to the close of the war. I held the command of the district up to December, 1864, except at short intervals, when the exigencies of the service required a larger body of troops than I h
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Morale of General Lee's army. (search)
t the time, files of our religious newspapers, a large number of letters and memoranda from chaplains and army missionaries, and other data, going to show that the world has rarely witnessed such revivals as we had in Lee's army from the autumn of 1862 to the close of the war. I never expect to address such congregations, or to witness such results, as we daily had in that army. I frequently preached to several thousand eager listeners, and I have seen over five hundred inquirers after the way ral inches deep during the entire service, and that he counted in the number fourteen barefooted men. And this eagerness to hear the Gospel was even more manifest during the most active campaigns. On those famous marches of the Valley campaign of 1862, which won for our brave fellows the soubriquet of Jackson's foot cavalry, I never found the men too weary to assemble in large numbers at the evening prayer-meeting, and enter with hearty zest into the simple service. At half-past 7 o'clock in
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Characteristics of the armies (search)
rst treated to one side and then the other. Near the close of 1863, I left that part of the country, and went North; but, having been within both lines and both camps, my opportunities for observing the characteristics of the two armies were excellent. Beside, I had kinsmen and friends in each army operating in that region, and through them I had many inside views of camp life, and opportunities to contrast the traits of each army. The Union army was altogether the best fed. Early in 1862 the Confederates ceased to have coffee. Indeed, they had not from the first anything like a regular supply. Soon after meat and flour began to grow scarce. But the abundance of coffee which the Federals had was worth several regiments of men to that side. I personally knew of an amusing instance of coffee alone drawing three soldiers into the Federal army. Not far from us lived a family whom I will call Blank-father and two sons. The father was among the first to volunteer in the Southe
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Union cavalry at Gettysburg. (search)
e and sanitary regulations enforced, strict discipline maintained, inefficient officers were discharged by the examining board, and their vacancies given deserving non-commissioned officers. When the Army of the Potomac moved, in the spring of 1862, to the Peninsula, it was accompanied by a cavalry force, the volunteer regiments of which were in a surprising state of serviceability, considering the short time and the unfavorable circumstances under which their real organization had been effecket and escort duty, absorbed pretty much the entire cavalry. Returning from the Peninsula, the cavalry disembarked at Alexandria, in condition very unfitted for the hard service that was expected of it in the Maryland campaign of the fall of 1862. But little improvement was made, and, with some noted exceptions, nothing strikingly brilliant was accomplished by it until General. Hooker took command of the Army of the Potomac. Then it was at last thought that the cavalry, properly organiz
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The right flank at Gettysburg. (search)
. Colonel William Brooke-Rawle. It is but natural that the battle which proved to be the turning point of the Rebellion should attract more attention, and be more thoroughly studied, than any other. To some, it may seem eating to reconciliate in the day to discuss a new phase of that fearful struggle; but to those still living who there assisted, the whole subject is one of interest. The History of the civil War in America, by the Comte de Paris, has been written to the end of the year 1862, with a degree of ability which is remarkable. In his search for the truth concerning the campaign of Gettysburg, for his forthcoming volume, that author has loosened an avalanche of newspaper and manuscript communications, especially from our friends on the other side, and he may well hesitate before attempting to reconcile the many disputed questions which have arisen. So peculiar do the views of some writers appear to us, that we begin to distrust the memory of those days, and almost to
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Torpedo service in Charleston harbor. (search)
less than a minute. Since writing the above, I have been informed by Captain F. Barrett, United States Navy, that he had invented the same spar-torpedo in the first year of the war, but it had not been applied by the Federals. In the spring of 1862, I had also recommended its use to General Lovell, for the defense of New Orleans, by arming river boats with it, to make night attacks on the enemy's fleet-but it was proposed to use it above water. I then determined to employ this important invedescribed this device to several of my engineer and artillery officers; but before I could have it applied I was ordered to Virginia to assume command of the Confederate force then assembling at Manassas. Afterward, on my return to Charleston, in 1862, one of my artillery officers, Lieutenant Colonel Yates, an intelligent and zealous soldier, applied this principle (modified, however) to one of the heavy guns in the harbor with such satisfactory results that I gave him orders to apply it as rap
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