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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 8 results in 4 document sections:

Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 3.-attack on the defences of Mobile. (search)
obile Bay, passing between Forts Morgan and Gaines, and encountering and overcoming the rebel fleet, I had the satisfaction to receive this day. Some preliminary account of your operations had previously reached us through rebel channels. Again it is my pleasure and my duty to congratulate you and your brave associates on an achievement unequalled in our service by any other commander, and only surpassed by that unparalleled naval triumph of the squadron under your command in the spring of 1862, when, proceeding up the Mississippi, you passed Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and, overcoming all obstructions, captured New-Orleans, and restored unobstructed navigation to the commercial emporium of the great central valley of the Union. The Bay of Mobile was not only fortified and guarded by forts and batteries on shore, and by submerged obstructions, but the rebels had also collected there a formidable fleet, commanded by their highest naval officer — a former captain in the Union nav
of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attacks upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 2. Adam Duncan (Boatswain's Mate) is recommended forr of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 3. Charles Deakin (Boatswain's Mate) is recommended r of New-Orleans; and on board the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 4. Cornelius Cronan (Chief Quartermaster) is recomme present at the surrender of New-Orleans; and in the attack on the batteries below Vicksburgh, in 1862. Joined the Richmond in September, 1863. 5. William Wells (Quartermaster) is recommended for ow New-Orleans, and on board of the Brooklyn in the attack upon the batteries below Vicksburgh in 1862. He received two wounds in the left leg, and a severe one in the head, in the engagements with F
th the reserve of coin preexisting in our country, experience sustained the expectations of those who devised the system. Thus on the first of the following December, coin had only reached a premium of about twenty per cent, although it had already become apparent that the commerce of the country was threatened with permanent suspension by reason of the conduct of neutral nations, and that the necessary result must be the exhaustion of our specie reserve. Wheat, in the beginning of the year 1862, was selling at one dollar and thirty cents per bushel, not exceeding, therefore, its average price in time of peace. The other agricultural products of the country were at similar moderate rates, thus indicating that there was no excess of circulation, and that the rate of premium on specie was heightened by the exceptional causes which tended to its exhaustion without the possibility of renewing the supply. This review of the policy of your predecessors is given in justice to them, and
possession of a secret circular, issued in Charleston five months before the firing on Sumter. The document is genuine. It is signed by one of the wealthiest and ablest lawyers of South-Carolina, and the copy which I inclose to the Tribune was addressed to one of the most prominent and influential citizens of Alabama--a Huntsville rebel whom General Logan ordered south of our lines. It should be borne in mind that this circular was issued before the meeting of the Congress of the of 1861-62--before the introduction of the Crittenden resolutions — before the Peace Congress. Yet now, after nearly three years of unparalleled war, you find incompetent officers and unworthy citizens proposing these same disclaimers and overtures. Executive chamber, the 1860 Association, Charleston, Nov. 10, 1860. In September last, several gentlemen of Charleston met to confer in reference to the position of the South in the event of the accession of Mr. Lincoln and the Republican party to pow