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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 42 results in 12 document sections:

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ajor of the Twentieth Massachusetts, General Vogdes a major in the regular artillery, and General Lee was colonel of the Twentieth Massachusetts. Brevet Brigadier-General G. W. Neff Brevet Brigadier-General P. J. Revere Brigadier-General I. Vogdes Colonel W. E. Woodruff Brevet Brigadier-General W. R. Lee Colonel A. M. Wood the unreasoning censure of public opinion, and at the same time keep their prisoners. Prisoners in the North got more to eat than in the South, after 1862, at least, yet they often got less than the amount to which they were entitled by the army regulations. In the South during the last year of the war, prisoners starved, while their guards fared little better. With all the resources of the North, prisoners were often hungry, frequently because of the inefficiency of their commanders. Commissaries in collusion with contractors sometimes reduced the rations of the prisoners both in quality and quantity. In one case, at least, a commissary wa
ate prisoners soon became so large that other prisons were necessary, and during 1862 it was determined to restrict this prison to officers. The number so confined assouri Fair Ground, which had been used during the fall and winter of 1861 and 1862 as barracks for a few Indiana troops. The Camp was turned into a prison to acconear Springfield, Illinois, which was, however, abandoned for prison purposes in 1862. After the suspension of the agreement to exchange prisoners, May 25, 1863, tguard. Belle Isle was an island in the James River, near Richmond, used after 1862 for the confinement of non-commissioned officers and enlisted men. The drainage he State Fair-grounds which had been used during the fall and winter of 1861 and 1862 as barracks for Indiana troops. The Camp was turned into a prison to accommodato that this prison belongs, in part at least, to this class also. As early as 1862, the Confederate Commissary Department broke down under the strain of feeding bo
dence, marked by perfect courtesy on both sides, took place during the summer of 1862 between General Lee and General McClellan. On the 6th of June, a week after thehich carried exchanged prisoners to Aiken's Landing, and later to City Point, in 1862, for the exchange to be completed. Whatever their enthusiasm for the Stars and ts between commanders in the field were made. Meanwhile, though the cartel of 1862 declared that all captures must be reduced to actual possession, and that all pring the river. The scene was much the same when this was a point of exchange in 1862, but there were no colored troops in the Union armies until the following year. he dwelling of A. M. Aiken, who gave the locality his name. For a short time in 1862 Aiken's Landing, on the James River just below Dutch Gap, was used as a point ofge for soldiers captured in the East. Many prisoners from the Eastern armies in 1862 lifted their tired eyes to this comfortable place, which aroused thoughts of hom
lar ration of beef and bread was cooked for the prisoners, but anything else was prepared by the prisoners themselves, or by some old negro paid by the mess. In 1862, some of the Confederate privates taken at Glendale, or Frayser's Farm, were sent to Fort Warren, in Boston Harbor, then under the command of Colonel Dimick, where bitterness, and attempts were made on both sides to send provisions to their men. The boxes sent by relatives or friends were generally delivered. In the fall of 1862, considerable quantities of clothing were sent to Richmond to be distributed by Federal officers, and also a number of boxes of food, so that certain tents in Bellner did not in fact receive the same clothes as his captor, or the same quantity of food, except for a few months at the beginning of the war. It was announced, in 1862, that the regular soldier's ration had been found too large for men living lives of absolute idleness, and therefore on July 7, 1862, the commissary-general of pri
never renewed, even at the President's request, so jealous of personal liberty were the Southerners. prisoners in Forts Lafayette and Warren in the early part of 1862 and recommended the discharge of a considerable number, as no charges whatever had been made against them. These were generally discharged upon taking the oath ofgrapher and prison reasoning of Chief Justice Taney in the Merryman case, was published in the newspapers and received a wide circulation. In the spring term of 1862, while on the bench at Easton, he was arrested by J. L. McPhail, deputy provost-marshal of Baltimore. Refusing to recognize the authority of the provostmar-shalafter taking an oath that she would not return. With her were sent Mrs. Augusta Morris and Mrs. C. V. Baxley, against whom similar charges had been brought. In 1862, a partisan character began to be attached to the arrests. It was charged that many were arrested purely on account of politics. In some of the Western States th
gular meeting of the Association of Army and Navy Surgeons, organized in Richmond, August, 1863, with Samuel P. Moore, the Confederate Surgeon-General, as president. Dr. J. J. Chisolm, who entered the army as a surgeon from Charleston, South Carolina, wrote an excellent little Manual of Military Surgery of about four or five hundred 12mo pages; and another manual, about the same size, was prepared by surgeons detailed for that purpose by Surgeon-General Moore, and published in Richmond, in 1862 or 1863. These were supplied to many field and hospital surgeons by the Government. Another work published at Richmond in order that the medical officers, as well as the public, might be supplied with information, which at that time was greatly needed, was prepared by direction of Surgeon-General Moore, by Francis Peyre Porcher, M. D., formerly surgeon in charge of the city hospital in Charleston, South Carolina, and professor of materia medica and therapeutics in the medical college of t
fore, July 18, 1861, after the battle of Blackburn's Ford. The houses upon the field of battle, especially the first year, before the field-hospital system was perfected, were often utilized for army hospital purposes. Mrs. Spinners house in 1862—used as a hospital in 1861 during the Bull Run battle The stone church at Centreville—a hospital before Bull Run I found an old carriage-and wagon-shop about sixty by one hundred feet, two stories high. It had a good roof, plenty of windows aission is visiting the field hospital established near the Rappahannock River, a mile or so from the heights, where lay at the same time the wounded appearing on the opposite page. Although the work of this Commission was only supplementary after 1862, they continued to supply many delicacies, and luxuries such as crutches, which did not form part of the regular medical corps paraphernalia. The effect of their work can be seen here, and also the appearance of men after the Shock of gunshot wou
chmond, as a site for the new hospital, and Doctor McCaw was placed in charge. Some of the buildings were opened early in 1862, and before the end of the war one hundred and fifty wards had been constructed. They were usually commodious buildings, limate caused much sickness among the troops drawn from the Gulf States to Tennessee and Kentucky during the winter of 1861-62, and that only by the greatest exertions was Medical Director Yandell able to provide for the care of the sick. Most of thMen, Little Women, An Old Fashioned Girl, and the other books that have endeared her to millions of readers. Her diary of 1862 contains this characteristic note: November. Thirty years old. Decided to go to Washington as a nurse if I could find a pld and punctured wounds (not made by weapons of war), and poisoning, a total of 171,565 cases, with 3,025 deaths. Early in 1862, the aggressive movement of troops vacated a large number of rough barracks which they had previously occupied. Advantage
deral sick and wounded Edward L. Munson, M. D., Major, Medical Department, United States Army Well-equipped ambulance bearers of the army of the Potomac, 1862—drill in removing wounded Removing the wounded from Marye's heights, May 2, 1864: ambulance corps of the fifty-seventh New York infantry This spirited scene unkenness and incompetency of the drivers, the total absence of Ambulance drill in the field—the newly organized corps soon after Antietam This busy scene of 1862 reveals an ambulance drill of the newly organized and wellequipped corps. On the left is a man on a litter with his arm thrown above his head. Another man on a ls lying on the bare ground, and his cap lies at a little distance from his head. This photograph would have comforted the anxious friends and relatives at home in 1862, from its portrayal of the efficiency of the organization. ambulance attendants are now working their legitimate results—results which I feel I have no right to k<
on-General Moore, and published in Richmond, in 1862 or 1863. These were supplied to many field and hospital purposes. Mrs. Spinners house in 1862—used as a hospital in 1861 during the Bull Run of this Commission was only supplementary after 1862, they continued to supply many delicacies, and ge. Some of the buildings were opened early in 1862, and before the end of the war one hundred and Tennessee and Kentucky during the winter of 1861-62, and that only by the greatest exertions was Medeared her to millions of readers. Her diary of 1862 contains this characteristic note: November. Th of 171,565 cases, with 3,025 deaths. Early in 1862, the aggressive movement of troops vacated a lad ambulance bearers of the army of the Potomac, 1862—drill in removing wounded Removing the woundcorps soon after Antietam This busy scene of 1862 reveals an ambulance drill of the newly organizoved its value during the Peninsula campaign of 1862. The transfer of troops to this new and somewh[1 more...]<
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