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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2. You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 5 document sections:

Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
go to Cambridge, where my first day is engaged to Whewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectionate letter from Lord Morpeth, in which he enclosed a letter of introduction to the Countess of Granville, Lady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth's mother, were the daughters of the fifth earl of Devonshire. Lord Granville died in 1846, and Lady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, December 5. (search)
go to Cambridge, where my first day is engaged to Whewell, &c. A few days ago I received a most friendly and affectionate letter from Lord Morpeth, in which he enclosed a letter of introduction to the Countess of Granville, Lady Granville (Henrietta Elizabeth) was the wife of Lord Granville, then English Ambassador at Paris. She and her sister, Georgiana, who was Lord Morpeth's mother, were the daughters of the fifth earl of Devonshire. Lord Granville died in 1846, and Lady Granville in 1862. His son is a distinguished statesman. now in Paris. Sir Robert Inglis expressed himself to-night in terms of the highest admiration of Dr. Channing's Texas, which is a good deal from such a churchman. I passed a very pleasant evening last week—till long past midnight—with Mr. and Mrs. Basil Montagu. Basil Montagu, 1770-1851. He was educated at Cambridge, and called to the bar in 1798. He made the Law of Bankruptcy, both in practice and as a writer, his specialty in the profession.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
for acknowledging the Mexican Republic; and was appointed Governor of the Ionian Islands, 1849-1855, and of Ceylon, 1855-1860. His father, Robert Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De Vere, and De Clifford; and of works on international law and other subjects. son of Tremaine Ward, and M. P., whose motion on Irish affairs nearly upset the ministry; Charles Austin (the first lawyer in England, mejudice); Gibbon Wakefield; Edward Gibbon Wakefield, 1796-1862. He was an author of books on colonial questions, and private secretary of the Earl of Durham in Canada in 1839. He died in New Zealand, with whose interests he had become identified. Stanley, M. P. (not Lord); and Miss Martineau, who seemed surprised to meet me there. His Lordship is remarkable in personal appearance,— slender, upright, with an open countenance, coal-black hair and eyes. He is very frank in the expression of his opinions, and uses good language, without being fluent. Th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, London, Jan. 12. (search)
for acknowledging the Mexican Republic; and was appointed Governor of the Ionian Islands, 1849-1855, and of Ceylon, 1855-1860. His father, Robert Plumer Ward, who died in 1846, was the author of three novels,—Tremaine, De Vere, and De Clifford; and of works on international law and other subjects. son of Tremaine Ward, and M. P., whose motion on Irish affairs nearly upset the ministry; Charles Austin (the first lawyer in England, mejudice); Gibbon Wakefield; Edward Gibbon Wakefield, 1796-1862. He was an author of books on colonial questions, and private secretary of the Earl of Durham in Canada in 1839. He died in New Zealand, with whose interests he had become identified. Stanley, M. P. (not Lord); and Miss Martineau, who seemed surprised to meet me there. His Lordship is remarkable in personal appearance,— slender, upright, with an open countenance, coal-black hair and eyes. He is very frank in the expression of his opinions, and uses good language, without being fluent. Th
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 28: the city Oration,—the true grandeur of nations.—an argument against war.—July 4, 1845.—Age 34. (search)
mes, of which two are yet to be issued. He had never any sentimental aversion to the use of force as such, even when necessary to the extent of taking life. In 1842 he was earnestly in favor of decisive measures against the rebellion in Rhode Island, and of the use of the national troops for its suppression. Ante, Vol. II. p. 212. He went further in sustaining Mackenzie's summary execution of the Somers mutineers than many who did not share his peace views. Ante, Vol. II. pp. 233-237. In 1862 he advised President Lincoln not to commute the death-sentence passed upon a slave-trader, to the end that the traffic itself should be branded as infamous. When the Southern Rebellion was gathering its forces, he resisted all schemes of compromise, although well assured that their defeat involved inevitable civil war; and, during the winter of 1860-61, conferred frequently with General Scott to promote plans for the military protection of the national capital and forts. Works, Vol. V. p