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William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 1,239 1,239 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 467 467 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 184 184 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 171 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 159 159 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 156 156 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 102 102 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 79 79 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 77 77 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Condensed history of regiments. 75 75 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for 1862 AD or search for 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 22 results in 6 document sections:

Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 4: Marylanders enlist, and organize to defend Virginia and the Confederacy. (search)
artillery, Third Maryland, Capt. Henry B. Latrobe; and the Chesapeake, Fourth Maryland, Capt. William Brown, were organized and mustered into the service early in 1862 and served with distinction, the Third Maryland in the army of the Southwest with Johnston and Kirby Smith, and the Fourth Maryland in the army of Northern Virginiy and distinction in the defense of Fort Sumter, for a large part of the garrison of that fortress during its bombardment were Marylanders. During the autumn of 1862 seven troops of Marylanders were collected under Lieut.-Col. Ridgely Brown, from Montgomery county, as the First Maryland cavalry. When the First regiment was musearts and words of its old members. The Second Maryland infantry and the First Maryland cavalry were in the valley of Virginia about Harrisonburg in the winter of 1862 and 1863. Co. F of the cavalry was recruited by three rich young Baltimoreans—Augustus F. Schwartz, captain; C. Irving Ditty, first lieutenant, and Fielder C. Slin
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. In November, 1861, Gen. Joseph E. Johnston, then in command of the Confederate army of the Potomac, withdrew from the posts of Mason's and Munson's Hills, established by Beauregard, having information that McClellan was about to sweep them in. Beauregard had established a capital secret service, and his spies in Washington, in the departments and in McClellan's headquarters, kept his headquarters perfec a first-rate reputation, and in 1861 made a brilliant campaign in West Virginia, the American Switzerland, against Wise, Floyd and Robert E. Lee. He was, therefore, with reason regarded as the first soldier on his side. During the winter of 1861-62 he prepared a plan of a grand campaign, of which Richmond was to be the objective, and which was to be carried but by the army of the Potomac under his personal direction, in conjunction with an army in West Virginia under General Milroy, and anot
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. (search)
Chapter 7: Marylanders in 1862 under Gen. Robert E. Lee. After Cross Keys and Port Republic, when Fremont and Shields were sent whirling down the valley, Jackson made a feint of pursuit, and pushed his cavalry some marches after them. He ordered the First Maryland to Staunton to recruit, where, during the next ten days, Comf arms, written that night by Orderly-Sergeant Robert Cushing, of the First Maryland regiment. He was killed at Gettysburg, July 3, 1863. Friday, June 27th (1862), battle of Cold Harbor. Our regiment on reserve marched and countermarched all day; about half-past 5 moved forward, got under enemy's fire before six. Shells f He rode with Jackson's staff, but it was impossible to-care for green volunteers in the rapid evolutions of the army of Northern Virginia from September 10 to 18, 1862. The new recruits merely followed along after the army and dispersed after the battle of Sharpsburg. It is probable that if a strong regiment of Marylanders unde
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 8: Maryland under Federal military power. (search)
and the mayor of Baltimore had been arrested in July and imprisoned at Fort Lafayette. Thus, at the beginning of the year 1862, the Federal army of occupation was commanded by Major-General Dix in Baltimore; Hooker in Charles county, and along the Pt the head of seventy-two kinsmen, descendants of soldiers of the Revolution, his own flesh and blood! In the summer of 1862 the First and Second Eastern Shore regiments were raised under Colonels Wallace and Wilkins; the First and Second regimentr's battery of light artillery. The First regiment, as we have seen, served with distinction in the valley under Banks in 1862. The Second was with Burnside at New Bern, N. C. There they received the following decoration from their commanding gener, Lieutenant-Colonel Miller and Maj. James M. Deems, served under Generals Buford and Sigel in the army of the Potomac, in 1862. The Potomac home brigade, Col. William P. Maulsby, and the Purnell Legion, were enlisted and organized as home guards
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: Maryland artillery—Second Maryland regiment infantryFirst Maryland cavalry. (search)
Pope's advance came up in heavy force, but Dement's guns stopped them until Ewell got out comfortably to Manassas. At Manassas in the battle of August 28, 29, 30, 1862, the three Maryland batteries —the First, Captain Dement; the Second, Baltimore light, Captain Brockenbrough; the Third, Chesapeake, Captain Brown, performed disti a graphic account of the regiment in his Maryland Line, C. S. A., which has been freely drawn on in this chapter. was organized at Winchester, Va., in the fall of 1862, of companies recruited in Richmond by officers of the First Maryland and some Marylanders who had come to Virginia after the battle of Sharpsburg. Those most actof the Maryland Line, consisting of the First Maryland infantry, the First Maryland cavalry and the Second Maryland or Baltimore light artillery. The winter of 1862-63 was employed in picketing and scouting General Jones' front and accompanying the command on various raids on the Baltimore & Ohio railroad and to collect provis
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
with Stonewall Jackson all through his celebrated Valley campaign of 1862, and the opening of the Seven Days fighting before Richmond. At theh he accompanied to the support of Jackson in the Valley campaign of 1862 In this famous series of glorious battles and brilliant maneuvers heral Tilghman was a prisoner of war until his exchange in the fall of 1862, when he rejoined the army of the West, then in north Mississippi, an Jackson's division, with which he served in the Valley campaign of 1862. He led the advance and opened the battle of Port Republic and in t Albert Sidney Johnston. He was promoted brigadier-general early in 1862, and was assigned by General Johnston to the command of the Confeder he had refused to do. He proceeded to Richmond in the winter of 1861-62, and at once entered the Confederate service, with rank of captain, oent held this position until the close of the Peninsular campaign of 1862, contributing to the success of the Confederate arms, and was then a