Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for February 1st, 1862 AD or search for February 1st, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Memoir of Jane Claudia Johnson. (search)
e British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an American merchantman in command of Captain Nelson. She was boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who carried away all that was valuable, and burned the ship. On the 21st, she arrived at Southampton, England. Our flag in England. The Nashville enjoyed the distinction of being the first war vessel to fly the flag of the Confederate States in the waters of England. Here we remained until the latter part of January, 1862. About the 1st of February, 1862, we sailed for the Confederacy, evading the United States steamer Tuscarora, which had for some time been watching an opportunity to capture the Nashville, having been sent for that purpose. The manner of our escape is worthy of mention. The Queen's proclamation of neutrality required that neither belligerant should leave port until twenty-four hours after the hour set for the sailing of the other. The Tuscarora immediately got under way and lay off the port to avoid the restrictio
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
e British channel the ship Harvey Birch, an American merchantman in command of Captain Nelson. She was boarded by an officer and boat's crew, who carried away all that was valuable, and burned the ship. On the 21st, she arrived at Southampton, England. Our flag in England. The Nashville enjoyed the distinction of being the first war vessel to fly the flag of the Confederate States in the waters of England. Here we remained until the latter part of January, 1862. About the 1st of February, 1862, we sailed for the Confederacy, evading the United States steamer Tuscarora, which had for some time been watching an opportunity to capture the Nashville, having been sent for that purpose. The manner of our escape is worthy of mention. The Queen's proclamation of neutrality required that neither belligerant should leave port until twenty-four hours after the hour set for the sailing of the other. The Tuscarora immediately got under way and lay off the port to avoid the restrictio