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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 14 14 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 1 1 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 1 1 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 1 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 1 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America. 1 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 1 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 13: the capture of New Orleans. (search)
ebellious spirit of citizens, 349. Butler's famous woman order its effects, 350. a traitor hung Butler's administration, 351. effect of the capture of New Orleans, 352. Ship Island was the place of rendezvous for the naval as well as the land portion of the forces destined for the capture of New Orleans. The naval force was placed under the command of Captain David G. Farragut, a loyal Tennesseean, who sailed from Hampton Roads in the National armed steamer Hartford, on the 2d of February, 1862, and arrived in the harbor of Ship Island on the 20th of the same month, having been detained by sickness at Key West. He had been instructed by the Secretary of the Navy Jan. 20, 1862. to proceed with all possible dispatch to the Gulf of Mexico, with orders for Flag-officer McKean, on duty there, to transfer to the former the command of the Western Gulf squadron. He was informed that a fleet of bomb-vessels, under Commander David D. Porter (with whose father Farragut had cruised i
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 14: battle and capture of Fort Henry by the Navy. (search)
F. Smith, who had made a reconnoissance, reported could easily be done. The gun-boats at that time were subject to General Halleck's orders, and Flag-officer Foote, who commanded them, had recommended a united movement of Army and Navy against the forts. The desired permission was finally granted to these officers, but the gallant commander of the Army contingent was greatly hampered by detailed instructions furnished by the Commander-in-Chief. Grant started from Cairo on the 2d of February, 1862, with 17,000 men in transports, and Foote accompanied him with seven gun-boats. After reconnoitering the forts the Army landed at Bailey's Ferry, just out of reach of the enemy's fire. The Confederates had erected their works at Fort Henry on both sides of the river, with a garrison of 2,800 men, under Brigadier General Tighlman. The main fortification was on the eastern bank. It was a strong field-work with a bastioned front, defended by seventeen heavy guns, twelve of which bo
y plan was preposterous. I returned to Cairo very much crest-fallen. He persevered, however, and after consulting with the officer commanding the gunboats at Cairo, he renewed, by telegraph, the suggestion that, if permitted, he could take and hold Fort Henry on the Tennessee. This time he was backed by the officer in command of the gunboats. Next day, he wrote fully to explain his plan. In two days he received instructions from headquarters to move upon Fort Henry, and on the 2nd of February, 1862, the expedition started. He took Fort Henry on the 6th of February, and announcing his success to General Halleck, informed him that he would now take Fort Donelson. On the 16th, Fort Donelson surrendered, and. Grant made nearly 15,000 prisoners. There was delight in the North, depression at Richmond. Grant was at once promoted to be major-general of volunteers. He thought, both then and ever after, that by the fall of Fort Donelson the way was opened to the forces of the North
iver. It covered two or three acres of ground, mounted 17 large guns, 11 of them bearing upon any vessels approaching from below, with a spacious intrenched camp in its rear, and a wide abatis encircling all. It was defended by Gen. Lloyd Tilghman, of Kentucky, with 2,600 men. To Brig.-Gen. U. S. Grant, of Illinois, was assigned the task of its reduction, with the powerful aid of Commodore A. H. Foote and his fleet of seven gunboats, four of them partially iron-clad. Leaving Cairo Feb. 2, 1862. with some 15,000 men on steam transports, he moved up the Ohio to the mouth of the Tennessee, then ascended that stream to within ten miles of Fort Henry, where his transports halted, Feb. 4-5. while Com. Foote, with his gunboats, proceeded cautiously up the river, shelling the woods on either side to discover any masked batteries that might there be planted. Having pushed this reconnoissance far enough to receive a 32-pound ball through the unprotected side of one of his boats, Gen.
l, Miss. 5 Fayetteville, N. C. 1 Present, also, at Frederickton, Mo.; Siege of Corinth, Miss.; Jackson. Miss.; Big Black, Miss.; Pocotaligo, S. C.; Sherman's March; Bentonville, N. C. notes.--Organized May 14, 1861, at Joliet, and mustered in June 13th. It left camp the next week for Alton, from whence it moved, July 6th, to Cape Girardeau, Mo., remaining there or in its vicinity seven months, during which it was engaged on several minor expeditions, and in some fighting. On February 2, 1862,--then in W. H. Wallace's Brigade, McClernand's Division,--it embarked for Fort Donelson, where it sustained a loss of 18 killed, 108 wounded, and 6 missing; total, 132; Lieutenant-Colonel William Erwin, an officer who had seen service in the Mexican war, was killed in this action, a round shot striking him in the breast; every man on the color-guard was either killed or wounded. At Shiloh the brigade was commanded by Colonel Marsh, the loss of the regiment amounting to 22 killed, 107
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
remove this distinguished officer from this district, especially at the present time, when the recent law granting bounty and furloughs is having a disorganizing effect. I fear that General Beauregard's removal from the troops he has formed may increase this effect among them. In this connection, permit me to urge the necessity to this army, of the general officers I have asked for more than once. Most respectfully, Your obedient servant, J. E. Johnston, General. Centreville, February 2, 1862. General S. Cooper, Adjutant and Inspector-General. Sir: We are beginning to feel the want of the arms recently sent to Richmond under orders from the War Department. One regiment already has twenty-three men returned from hospital, who are without arms. The recruiting directed in General Order No. 2 will give us men who cannot be armed, unless a part at least of the arms referred to can be returned. Permit me again to remind the War Department that a division and five brigades
then reputed the ablest general of the South. At Bowling Green, Kentucky, he had thirty thousand men. Believing, perhaps, that he could not hold Kentucky, he determined to save Tennessee for the South and took his stand at Nashville. On February 2d, 1862, General Grant left Cairo with his army of seventeen thousand men and on transports moved up the Ohio and the Tennessee to attack Fort Henry. Accompanying him was Flag-Officer Foote with his fleet of seven gunboats, four of them ironclads. City, Illinois, during the latter half of 1861. When Grant finally obtained permission from General Halleck to advance the attack upon Fort Henry on the Tennessee River, near the border of Kentucky, Flag Officer Foote started up the river, February 2, 1862, convoying the transports, loaded with the advance detachment of Grant's seventeen thousand troops. Arriving before Fort Henry on February 6th, the intrepid naval commander at once began the bombardment with a well-aimed shot from the Cinci
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid, Chapter 2: (search)
f as long as possible, in order that I may increase the strength of the force. H. W. Halleck, Major-General. On the same day Halleck telegraphed Grant: Reenforcements are receiving arms. Delay your movements until I telegraph. Let me know when the channel is clear. And on the next day: I can hear nothing from Buell, so fix your own time for the advance. Three regiments will come down Monday. Subsequently the following passed between Halleck and Buell: St. Louis, February 2, 1862. Brigadier-General Buell, Louisville, Ky. General: Yours of the 30th ultimo is received. At present it is only proposed to take and occupy Fort Henry and Dover, and, if possible, cut the railroad from Columbus to Bowling Green. * * * But it will take some time to get troops ready to advance far south of Fort Henry. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. W. Halleck, Major General. St. Louis, February 7, 1862. To General Buell, Louisville. You say you regret that w
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Tennessee, 1862 (search)
1862 Feb. 2: Skirmish, Morgan County(No Reports.) Feb. 2-6: Operations against Fort HenryILLINOIS--2d and 4th Cavalry; Stewart's, Dollins', O'Harnett's and Carmichael's Cavalry Companies; Batteries "A," "B" and "D," 1st Light Arty.; "D" and "E," 2d Light Arty.; 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th, 12th, 17th, 18th, 20th, 28th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 41st, 45th, 48th, 49th, 50th, 57th and 58th Infantry. IOWA--2d, 7th, 12th and 14th Infantry. MISSOURI--13th and 16th Infantry. Feb. 6: Capture of Fort HenryU. S. Gunboats "Essex," "Cincinnati," "Carondelet," "Conestoga," "St. Louis," "Tyler" and "Lexington." Feb. 12-16: Investment, Battles and Capture, Fort DonelsonILLINOIS--2d (Cos. "A" and "B") and 4th (Co. "I") Cavalry; Stewart's, Dollins', O'Harnett's and Carmichael's Cavalry Companies; Batteries "A," "B" and "D," 1st Light Arty.; "D" and "E," 2d Light Arty.; 7th, 8th, 9th, 11th, 12th, 17th, 18th, 20th, 28th, 29th, 30th, 31st, 32d (Co. "A"), 41st, 45th, 46th, 48th, 49th, 50th, 57th and 58th Infantry. IN
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories, Illinois Volunteers. (search)
, Tenn. 5th Subdistrict, District Middle Tennessee, to July, 1865. Service. Operations against Fort Henry, Tenn., February 2-6, 1862. At Fort Henry February 6-12. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Moved toCharleston January 8, 1862. Expedition toward Columbus, Ky., January 15-21. Operations against Fort Henry, Tenn., February 2-6, 1862. Occupation of Fort Henry February 6-12. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. 1865. Department of the Missouri to September, 1865. Service. Moved from Cairo, Ill., to Bird's Point, Mo., February 2, 1862; thence to Fort Henry, Tenn., February 8-9, and duty there till March 5 (Co. A at Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 13 Brigade, 3rd Division, 17th Army Corps, Army of the Tennessee, to July, 1865. Operations against Fort Henry, Tenn., February 2-6, 1862. Capture of Fort Henry February 6. Investment and capture of Fort Donelson, Tenn., February 12-16. Dut
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