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Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 12 12 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 9 9 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 3 3 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 26, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 4, 1862., [Electronic resource] 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 1 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 1 1 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 1 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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s impression grew that his elevation had turned his head. There was no foundation for such an unwarranted conclusion. Lincoln had not changed a particle. He was overrun with duties and weighted down with cares; his surroundings were different and his friends were new, but he himself was the same calm, just, and devoted friend as of yore. His letters were few and brief, but they showed no lack of gratitude or appreciation, as the following one to me will testify: Executive mansion, February 3, 1862. Dear William:-- Yours of January 30th is just received. Do just as you say about the money matters. As you well know, I have not time enough to write a letter of respectable length. God bless you, says Your friend, A. Lincoln. On February 19, 1863, I received this despatch from Mr. Lincoln: Would you accept a job of about a month's duration, at St. Louis, a day and mileage. Answer. A. Lincoln. His letters to others were of the same warm and generous tenor, but y
lellan, on receiving the order of January 3, asked the President whether it was to be regarded as final, or whether he could be permitted to submit in writing his objections to the plan of the Executive and his reasons for preferring his own. Permission was granted, and a letter was addressed to the Secretary of War, under date of February 3. But, before it had been submitted to the President, General McClellan received from him the following note:-- Executive Mansion, Washington, February 3, 1862. my dear Sir:--You and I have distinct and different plans for a movement of the Army of the Potomac,--yours to be done by the Chesapeake, up the Rappahannock to Urbana, and across land to the terminus of the railroad on the York River: mine to move directly to a point on the railroad southwest of Manassas. If you will give me satisfactory answers to the following questions, I shall gladly yield my plan to yours:-- 1st. Does not your plan involve a greatly larger expenditure o
and dispersion of our forces, or left the National metropolis, with its enormous depots of arms, munitions, and provisions, to say nothing of its edifices and archives, at the mercy of the Rebels, who could hardly fail to rush upon, sack, and burn it, if our grand army were transferred bodily to the base of the Virginian Peninsula. The President, therefore, before giving his assent to Gen. McClellan's project, addressed to him the following letter: Executive Mansion, Washington, February 3, 1862. my dear Sir: You and I have distinct and different plans for a movement of the Army of the Potomac; yours to be done by the Chesapeake, up the Rappahannock to Urbana, and across land to the terminus of the railroad on the York river; mine to move directly to a point on the railroad southwest of Manassas. If you will give satisfactory answers to the following questions, I shall gladly yield my plan to yours: 1st. Does not your plan involve a greatly larger expenditure of time
s General orders. The subjoined address to the soldiers, issued in the form of a general order, is characteristic of Gen. Burnside. It breathes the broad-hearted humanity that all feel to be a large element in his nature who have even the slightest intercourse with him. It also shows the confidence he reposes in his troops, it being an appeal to the humanity and honor of the men composing his army: Address to the troops.headquarters Department of North-Carolina, Pamlico Sound February 3, 1862. General orders, No. 5. This expedition being about to land on the soil of North-Carolina, the General Commanding desires his soldiers to remember that they are here to support the Constitution and the laws, to put down rebellion, and to protect the persons and property of the loyal and peaceable citizens of the State. In the march of the army, all unnecessary injuries to houses, barns, fences, and other property will be carefully avoided, and in all cases the laws of civilized w
equired. As soon as the leading divisions of infantry crossed the Pamunkey they would have moved on Richmond, covered by cavalry on both flanks. My letters of Feb. 3 and March 19, 1862, to the Secretary of War, show that, under certain circumstances, I contemplated crossing the James river and attacking Richmond from the southSecretary of War which is given below. Before this had been submitted to the President he addressed me the following not: executive Mansion Washington Feb. 3, 1862. my dear Sir: You and I have distinct and different plans for a movement of the Army of the Potomac: yours to be done by the Chesapeake, up the Rappahannock. These questions were substantially answered by the following letter of the same date to the Secretary of War: headquarters of the Army, Washington, Feb. 3, 1862. Sir: I ask your indulgence for the following papers, rendered necessary by circumstances. I assumed command of the troops in the vicinity of Washington
rey upon the commerce of the United States, President Lincoln issued a proclamation on April 19, 1861, declaring that these would be treated as pirates. An opportunity to enforce the proclamation soon arose. The privateer Savannah, with thirteen men on board, was captured off Charleston Harbor on June 3d. The prisoners were taken to New York and placed in the Tombs (the city prison), where they remained until turned over to the War Department and transferred to Fort Lafayette, on February 3, 1862. They were brought to trial on the charge of piracy on October 23, 1861, but they had excellent counsel and their case was presented with such skill and vigor that the jury disagreed. Before another trial could be had, it had been decided to treat them as prisoners of war. Undoubtedly this decision was hastened by the attitude of Great Britain, which was decidedly unfriendly to the claim of the United States, but the principal cause was the action of the Confederate Government, to be
Department of the Pacific, and after the war held various commands. He was retired in 1882, and died in San Francisco, May 4, 1885. Major-General Abner Doubleday (U. S. M. A. 1842) was born at Ballston Spa, New York, June 26, 1819, and served in the Mexican and Seminole wars. As captain of the artillery he was at Fort Sumter under Major Anderson, and fired upon the Confederates the first Federal gun of the Civil War. He served under Major-General Patterson in the Valley, and on February 3, 1862, was made brigadier-general of volunteers and placed in charge of the defenses of Washington. He had a brigade in the Third Corps, Army of Virginia, and afterward a division, which he retained when the corps again became the First Federal major-generals commanders of the tenth army corps J. M. Brannan commanded the Tenth Corps in 1862-63. W. T. H. Brooks commanded the Tenth Corps in 1864. David B. Birney commanded the Tenth Corps in 1864. Ormsby M. Mitchel comman
flank of Pickett's column at Gettysburg. James M. Warner Colonel of the 1st regiment of artillery. John W. Phelps commander of a New England brigade in operations on the Gulf in 1861-2. B. S. Roberts Colonel 4th regiment. George wright Colonel 9th U. S. Infantry. Stephen Thomas Colonel of the 8th regiment. Texas Andrew J. Hamilton Brigadier-General, 1862; resigned, 1865. Edmund J. Davis Colonel 1st Texas Cavalry, 1862; Brigadier-General, 1864. Meagher, T. F., Feb. 3, 1862. Meredith, S. A., Nov. 29, 1862. Miller, Stephen, Oct. 26, 1863. Mitchell, R. B., April 8, 1862. Montgomery, W. R., May 17, 1861. Morgan, Geo. W., Nov. 12, 1861. Nagle, James, Sept. 10, 1862. Naglee, H. M., Feb. 4, 1862. Nickerson, F. S., Nov. 29, 1862. Orme, Wm. W., Nov. 29, 1862. Owens, Joshua T., Nov. 29, 1862. Paine, Eleazer, Sept. 3, 1861. Patterson, F. E., April 11, 1862. Phelps, John S., July 19, 1862. Phelps, John W., May 17, 1861. Piatt, Abraham, April 28, 1862. P
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Doubleday, Abner, 1819-1893 (search)
Doubleday, Abner, 1819-1893 Military officer; born in Ballston Spa, N. Y., June 26, 1819; graduated at West Point in 1842; Abner Doubleday. served in the artillery in the war with Mexico; rose to captain in 1855; and served against the Seminole Indians in 1856-58. Captain Doubleday was an efficient officer in Fort Sumter with Major Anderson during the siege. He fired the first gun (April 12, 1861) upon the Confederates from that fort. On May 14 he was promoted to major, and on Feb. 3, 1862, to brigadier-general of volunteers. In Looker's corps, at the battle of Antietam, he commanded a division; and when Reynolds fell at Gettysburg, Doubleday took command of his corps. He had been made major-general in November, 1862, and had been conspicuously engaged in the battles of Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville. He was brevetted brigadier-general and major-general of the United States army in March, 1865; was commissioned colonel of the 35th Infantry in September, 1867; and was r
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles, Virginia, 1862 (search)
1862 Jan. 3: Reconnoissance to Big BethelNEW YORK--20th and 99th Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--11th Cavalry (3 Cos.). Jan. 9: Skirmish, Pohick RunMICHIGAN--5th Infantry. Jan. 17: Scout to Springfield and Burke's StationNEW HAMPSHIRE--5th Infantry (Co. "A"). Jan. 29: Skirmish, Lee's House, Occoquan Bridge.NEW JERSEY--1st Cavalry (Detachment). NEW YORK--37th Infantry (Detachment). Union loss, 1 killed, 4 wounded. Total, 5. Feb. 3: Reconnoissance to OccoquanMICHIGAN--3d Infantry (Cos. "H," "I"). Feb. 7: Expedition to Flint Hill and Hunter's MillsPENNSYLVANIA--5th Cavalry. Feb. 7: Skirmish, Fairfax Court HousePENNSYLVANIA--5th Cavalry. Feb. 22: Expedition to Vienna and Flint HillNEW YORK--43d Infantry. PENNSYLVANIA--5th Cavalry. Feb. 24: Skirmish, Mason's Creek, OccoquanNEW YORK--37th Infantry (Detachment). Union loss, 2 killed, 1 wounded. Total, 3. Feb. 24: Affair, Lewis ChapelPicket attack. Feb. 25-May 6: Operations in Loudon CountyMICHIGAN--1st Cavalry. PENNSYLVANIA--11th and 28th
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