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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 11: Goldsborough's expedition to the sounds of North Carolina. (search)
om Fort Cobb. Commander Rowan knew very little about the condition of affairs up the river, whether there were any batteries, torpedoes or obstructions, but he well knew that if there were any forts the Confederate gun-boats would naturally seek their protection and rely on their aid in any encounter that might follow with the Federal forces. The Attack on Roanoke Island by Commodore Goldsborough's gun-boats, and landing of troops under command of Generals Foster, Reno and Parks. February 8, 1862. enemy could select their point of attack or defence, and the Union commander was obliged to advance against them without having the slightest idea of the strength of their position. The little steamers under Rowan's command were certainly the frailest vessels that had ever been improvised for meeting the stern hazards of war. They carried heavy guns, however, and the gallant spirits who manned them were determined to win, no matter what the risks. Commander Rowan's plan was to a
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 15: capture of Fort Donelson and battle of Shiloh. (search)
te wounded. gallantry of Captain Walke. losses. General Grant's victory. results. gunboats repair to Cairo. Grant prepares to advance towards Shiloh. battle at Pittsburg Landing (Shiloh). services rendered by the gun-boats Lexington and Taylor. Captain Gwin's report. the Navy aids materially in saving the Army from destruction. a terrible battle and great loss of life. the Confederates as fighters. extracts from records of the times. congratulatory orders, &C. On the 8th of February, 1862, Gen. Grant telegraphed to Gen. Halleck: Fort Henry is ours; the gunboats silenced the batteries before the investment was completed. I shall take and destroy Fort Donelson on the 8th. and return to Fort Henry. The same reasons which had induced Grant to undertake the capture of Fort Henry still urged him to take Fort Donelson; that is, to get the control of the Tennessee and Cumberland Rivers and be able to penetrate into the heart of Tennessee with his troops and Foote's gun-bo