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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 8 8 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 28, 1862., [Electronic resource] 7 7 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Harvard Memorial Biographies 2 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 7: Prisons and Hospitals. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 2 2 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for February 27th, 1862 AD or search for February 27th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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gagement near Kinston March 14, with a small loss; but on the whole the North Carolina service proved less severe than was at first expected, though the loss from disease was considerable. Xiii. The Peninsular campaign. On Nov. 27, 1861, Lieutenant-General Scott, being seventy-five years of age, retired from the command of the American army and was succeeded by Maj.-Gen. G. B. McClellan, who, after some delay, submitted to the President the plan of a campaign against Richmond. On Feb. 27, 1862, the Secretary of War issued orders that steamers should be ready on March 18 to transport the newly organized Army of the Potomac to Fortress Monroe, and from March 17 to April 1 the troops embarked. They included the following Massachusetts infantry regiments: the 1st (Col. Robert Cowdin), the 7th (Col. D. N. Couch), the 9th (Col. Thomas Cass), the 10th (Col. H. S. Briggs), the 11th (Col. George Clark, Jr.), the 15th (Col. Charles Devens, Jr.), the 16th (Col. P. T. Wyman), the 18th (C