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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 811 811 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 15 15 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
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overnor Johnson, in the very spirit of Leonidas, whom he emulated. Sometimes it is harder to do right than to hold a Thermopylae. General Johnston was inexorable. It is sufficient here to say that this gallant and excellent man lived long enough to assure General Johnston of his approval of the strategy he then condemned. Colonel Robert W. Woolley (now of Louisville, Kentucky), who had enjoyed exceptional advantages of observation, in a communication to the New Orleans Picayune, in March, 1862, in describing General Johnston's work at Bowling Green, says: An army must be obtained, or else he must evacuate the citadel that guards Nashville. A small army was obtained; but where, or how, it will puzzle the historian of this war to relate. By extraordinary exertions he secured a regiment here and another there; but few with any drill, and only five of them for three months with uniforms. The army had to be built up; and the general had not only to organize the troops, but
March, 1862. March, 1 Our brigade, in command of General Dumont, started for Lavergne, a village eleven miles out on the Murfreesboro road, to look after a regiment of cavalry said to be in occupation of the place. Arrived there a little before sunset, but found the enemy had disappeared. The troops obtained whisky in the village, and many of the soldiers became noisy and disorderly. A little after nightfall the compliments of a Mrs. Harris were presented to me, with request that I would be kind enough to call. The handsome little white cottage where she lived was near our bivouac. It was the best house in the village; and, as I ascertained afterward, very tastefully if not elegantly furnished. She was a woman of perhaps forty. Her husband and daughter were absent; the former, I think, in the Confederate service. She had only a servant with her, and was considerably frightened and greatly incensed at the conduct of some soldiers, of she knew not what regiment, wh
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., McDowell's advance to Bull Run. (search)
ts at the earliest possible instant and by every possible means. The alarm in this dispatch and the apprehension it shows of McDowell's overwhelming strength are not in harmony with the more recent assurance of the Confederate commander, that through sources in Washington treasonable to the Union, and in other ways, he was almost as well informed of the strength of the hostile army in my [his] front as its commander.--J. B. F. The Stone Church, Centreville. From a photograph taken in March, 1862. McDowell was compelled to wait at Centreville until his provision wagons arrived and he could issue rations. His orders having carried his leading division under Tyler no farther than Centreville, he wrote that officer at 8:15 A. M. on the 18th, Observe well the roads to Bull Run and to Warrenton. Do not bring on an engagement, but keep up the impression that we are moving on Manassas. McDowell then went to the extreme left of his line to examine the country with reference to a su
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Incidents of the first Bull Run. (search)
the creek. Glancing down the valley, I saw Bee's brigade advancing, and galloped to meet him and report what I had seen. He divined the plans of Confederate fortifications about Manassas Junction. This view is from a photograph taken in March, 1862. It represents the works substantially as they were at the time of the battle. The Stone House on the Warrenton Turnpike. From a photograph taken in March, 1862. The stream in the foreground is Young's Branch. The Sudley road croMarch, 1862. The stream in the foreground is Young's Branch. The Sudley road crosses a little to the left of the picture. See map, page 204. McDowell, and, asking me to accompany him, rode rapidly past the Lewis house, across the hollow beyond it, and up the next hill through the pines, emerging on the summit immediately east of the Henry house. As the beautiful open landscape in front burst upon his vision, he exclaimed with enthusiasm: Here is the battle-field, and we are in for it! Bring up your guns as quickly as possible, and I'll look round for a good position.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Responsibilities of the first Bull Run. (search)
by the same orders honorably discharged from the service of the United States, on the expiration of his term of duty.-editors. will require your attention. It may be a ruse, but if a real movement, when your army has the requisite strength and mobility, you will probably find an opportunity, by a rapid movement through the passes, to strike him in rear or flank. It is matter of public notoriety that no incursion into the Valley worth the notice of a Confederate company was made until March, 1862. That the Confederate President should be ignorant of this is inconceivable. Mr. Davis says (p. 462): . . . I received from General Johnston notice that his position [at Centreville] was considered unsafe. Many of his letters to me have been lost, and I have thus far not been able to find the one giving the notice referred to, but the reply which is annexed clearly indicates the substance of the letter which was answered: General J. E. Johnston: . . . Your opinion that your position m
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
ring the night, were now in precipitate retreat in all directions, pursued by the First and Second Divisions as far as Keetsville, 9 miles to the north, and by a cavalry force under Colonel Bussey with 2 mountain howitzers to the south-west beyond Bentonville. So ended the battle of Pea Ridge, and our little army, instead of being beaten and compelled to surrender, had gained a decisive victory. The picture on the next page shows Big Mountain in the right background, as it appeared in March, 1862. When I visited the battle-field a few weeks ago (July 6th, 1887) the whole range of mountains was covered by a dense forest, and the rocky summits of Big Mountain were not discernible from the fields below, where our troops had been posted. In other respects there were not great changes. The rising ground stretching across the fields from east to west, with its highest elevation in the center, and on which my artillery was posted, shows at once how great our advantage must have been a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Union and Confederate Indians in the civil War. (search)
la's warriors showed themselves in an opening or in the prairie, the Confederates charged them to the timber, when a volley from the concealed Union Indians threw the charging column into confusion and sent it back in a hasty retreat. Night coming on put an end to the fight.-W. B. The Confederate Indians of Colonel Stand Watie's regiment, and those of Colonel Drew's regiment who had returned to the Confederate service under Pike and Cooper, also participated in the battle of Pea Ridge in March, 1862, where they were charged with scalping and mutilating the Federal dead on the field. General Pike, hearing of the scalping, called on the surgeon and assistants of his field-hospital for reports, and in their reports they stated that they found one of the Federal dead Who had been scalped. General Pike then issued an order, denouncing the outrage in the strongest language, and sent a copy of the order to General Curtis. General Pike claimed that part of the Indians were in McCulloch's c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Western flotilla at Fort Donelson, Island number10, Fort Pillow and — Memphis. (search)
he officers and men of the Carondelet was received from Flag-Officer Foote. A few days later the Carondelet was taken up on the ways at Mound City, Illinois,--six or seven miles above Cairo on the Ohio River,---for repairs; and a crowd of carpenters worked on her night and day. After the repairs were completed, she was ordered to make the experiment of backing Map of military and naval operations about Island number10. (based on the two maps by Captain A. B. Gray, C. S. A., made in March, 1862, and on official reports.) for correction of the line of the canal, see page 461. up-stream, which proved a laughable failure. She would sheer from one side of the river to the other, and with two anchors astern she could not be held steady enough to fight her bow-guns down-stream. She dragged both anchors alternately, until they came together, and the experiment failed completely. On the morning of the 23d the flag-officer made a reconnoissance to Columbus, Kentucky, with four gun
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Union and Confederate navies. (search)
yed. In addition to the vessels purchased and altered, the Confederate authorities built several new ones at New Orleans. Of these there were three William Faxon, chief clerk of the United States Navy Department during the war. From a photograph. wooden boats, the Livingston, Bienville, and Carondelet, and two iron-clads, the Louisiana and the Mississippi. The Bienville and Carondelet were substantially built side-wheelers of light draft, built on the lakes, and were only finished in March and April, 1862. They were unable to fill up their crews, and hence took no part in the action at the forts. Report of Joint Confederate Committee on the affairs of the Navy Department, p. 28. The Livingston, which had been attached some time before to the flotilla in the upper Mississippi, made its way to the Yazoo River, and was burnt there with the Polk and Van Dorn. The two new iron-clads, however, were intended to be by far the most important factors in the defense of New Orleans.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., chapter 15.58 (search)
Watching the Merrimac. R. E. Colston, Brigadier-General, C. S. A. In March, 1862, I was in command of a Confederate brigade and of a district on the south side of the James River, embracing all the river forts and batteries down to the mouth of Nansemond River. My pickets were posted all along the shore opposite Newport News. From my headquarters at Smithfield I was in constant and rapid communication through relays of couriers and signal stations with my department commander, Major-General Huger1 stationed at Norfolk. The situation of affairs, both Federal and State, at Norfolk, on the morning of the 19th of April, 1861], says J. T. Scharf in his History of the Confederate States Navy, was that the Federal authorities had there the U. S. frigate Cumberland, 24 guns, fully manned, ready for sea, and under orders for Vera Cruz; the brig Dolphin, 4 guns, fully manned, and ready for sea; the sloop Germantown, 22 guns, fully manned, ready for sea; the sloop Plymouth, 22 gun
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