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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 811 811 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 38 38 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 26 26 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 21 21 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 20 20 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 15 15 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 11 11 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 9 9 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 9 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 8 8 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for March, 1862 AD or search for March, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the army of Northern Virginia. (search)
ight, while we are standing here in the rain to guard their precious carcasses, must be content to take back seats when we get home. I gave him my hand there in the dark, and my pledge that I would stand with him on the camp platform. These frequent movements with cavalry, often requiring long or very rapid marches, made the men begin to speak of the regiment as the foot cavalry. But the first time I ever heard the sobriquet publicly applied was after the evacuation of Manassas, in March, 1862, while General Ewell was holding with his division the line of the Rappahannock. Our regiment had been on picket at Bealton Station as a support to Stuart's cavalry, and the enemy were rapidly advancing in large force, when another infantry regiment came down on a train of cars to relieve us. We had just gotten on the train, our friends were rapidly forming line of battle to meet the Federal advance, Jeb Stuart was going to the front with his fighting jacket on, and our train was slowly
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 9. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Sketch of Longstreet's division. (search)
ered, the movement was as eminently successful as it was judicious. The Washington artillery battalion This celebrated battalion was originally founded in 1838. In the Mexican war it was Company A, of Colonel Persifer Smith's regiment, of which Colonel J. B. Walton, who commanded the battalion from 1861 to 1864, was Lieutenant-Colonel. It was composed of five batteries, of which the first four served in Virginia, and the fifth with the Army of Tennessee. Its battery commanders in March, 1862, were: Captains C. W. Squires, T. L. Rosser, (afterwards Major-General of calvary), M. B. Miller, and B. F. Eshleman. Its material was superb; the cannooneers being almost exclusively young men of the best families of New Orleans. Its numbers were general small, as it refused to receive recruits promiscuously, and the four batteries usually averaged but three guns each. of New Orleans was assigned to Longstreet's division when this movement commenced, and continued to serve with the div