hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 28 28 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 19 19 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 9 9 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 6 6 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 7, 1862., [Electronic resource] 5 5 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March 6th, 1862 AD or search for March 6th, 1862 AD in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

in all instances where men in arms have voluntarily surrendered and taken the oath of allegiance to our common country, they have been discharged. No prisoners have, to my knowledge, been shot or hung, or cruelly treated by us. I know of no instance where my troops have treated females with violence, and I have not heard of a complaint of any kind. I enjoin on the troops kindness, protection and support for women and children. I shall, to the best of my ability, maintain our country's flag in Arkansas, and continue to make relentless war on its foes, but shall rejoice to see the restoration of peace in all the States and Territories of our country — that peace which we formerly enjoyed and earnestly desire; and I implore for each and all of us that ultimate, eternal peace which the world cannot give or take away. I have the honor to be, Very respectfully, your obedient servant, Samuel R. Curtis, Brig.-Gen. Commanding Army of the Southwest. Springfield, Mo., March 6, 1862.
dings unless accompanied by a member of the guard, whose duty it shall be to see that nothing is injured or removed. I have further directed that a white flag be displayed from the premises, to indicate that the place is not occupied for military purposes, and that the guard there stationed is entitled to the immunities which are accorded to the flag by all civilized nations. H. G. Wright, Brig.-Gen. Commanding. The following additional order was also issued: Douglas House, March 6, 1862. This property, belonging originally to Gen. Nathaniel Greene, a Revolutionary hero and a native of Rhode Island, is now,the property of his grandson, Mr. Nightingale. It is hereby ordered and enjoined upon all who may visit this place to hold everything about the place sacred, and in no case disturb or take away any article without a special order from Flag-Officer Du Pont or Gen. Wright. [Signed] John Rodgers, Charles Stedman, Commanders United States Navy. [Approved] S. F. Du
Doc. 79.-the emancipation message. sent to Congress March 6, 1862. Fellow-Citizens of the Senate and House of Representatives: I recommend the adoption of a joint resolution by your honorable bodies which shall be substantially as follows: Resolved, That the United States ought to cooperate with any State which may adopt a gradual abolishment of slavery, giving to such State pecuniary aid to be used by such State in its discretion, to compensate for the inconveniences, public and private, produced by such change of system. If the proposition contained in the resolution does not meet the approval of Congress and the country, there is the end; but if it does command such approval, I deem it of importance that the States and people immediately interested should be at once distinctly notified of the fact, so that they may begin to consider whether to accept or reject it. The Federal Government would find its highest interest in such a measure as one of the most efficient