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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 9 9 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Battles 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for March 8th, 1862 AD or search for March 8th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 80.-fight at Mississippi City, La. March 8, 1862. (search)
Doc. 80.-fight at Mississippi City, La. March 8, 1862. A correspondent gives the subjoined account of this affair: Owing to the large increase of troops at Ship Island, and the meagre facilities for encamping them, Gen. Phelps determined to send an officer to reconnoitre Mississippi City, with a view to establishing a camp at that point. An order was procured from the senior officer of the Ship Island squadron, Capt. James Alden, of the sloop-of-war Richmond, for the gunboat Calhoun, Capt. E. J. De Haven, to proceed to Mississippi City, under orders of Col. E. F. Jones, of the Twenty-sixth Massachusetts, who had been assigned the command of the expedition by Gen. Phelps. On Saturday, the eighth inst., at two o'clock P. M., fifty men each from companies B and I, Massachusetts Twenty-sixth, embarked on board the Calhoun, with forty rounds of cartridges and a day's rations. Company B was commanded by Capt. E. S. Clark and First Lieut. William H. Lamson, and company I by Capt.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 82.-fight in Hampton roads, Va., March 8th and 9th, 1862. (search)
Doc. 82.-fight in Hampton roads, Va., March 8th and 9th, 1862. Flag-officer Marston's report. United States steamer Roanoke, Hampton roads, March 9, 1862. To Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: I have the honor to inform you that yesterday, at one o'clock, one of the lookout vessels reported, by signal, thae following officers: Lieut. Joseph B. Smith, Acting Master Thomas Moore, and Pilot Wm. Rhodes. Report of Captain Watson. United States steamer Dragon, March 8, 1862. At six P. M., went alongside of the Roanoke, and was ordered to get up a big head of steam, and go on the starboard side and make fast, as the Merrimac wasflag, and renewing fire from that vessel under the impunity thus obtained. Jefferson Davis. March 11, 1862. C. S. Steam-battery Virginia, off Sewall's Point, March 8, 1862. Flag-officer: In consequence of the wound of Flag-Officer Buchanan, it becomes my duty to report that the Virginia left the yard this morning, at eleven A.
with their respective commanders, obey existing orders for the time, and be ready to obey additional orders when duly given. That the Heads of Departments, and especially the Secretaries of War and of the Navy, with all their subordinates, and the General-in-Chief, with all other commanders and subordinates of land and naval forces, will severally be held to their strict and full responsibilities for the prompt execution of this order. Abraham Lincoln. Executive mansion, Washington, March 8, 1862. President's General War Order, No. 2. Ordered, I. That the Major-General commanding the Army of the Potomac proceed forthwith to organize that part of said army destined to enter upon active operations, (including the reserve, but excluding the troops to be left in the fortifications about Washington,) into four army corps, to be commanded according to seniority of rank, as follows: First Corps, to consist of four divisions, and to be commanded by Major-Gen. I. McDowell. Sec
Doc. 90.-Beauregard's order respecting Bell-metal. To the Planters of the Mississippi Valley. headquarters army of the Mississippi, Jackson, Tenn., March 8, 1862. more than once a people fighting with an enemy less ruthless than yours; for imperilled rights not more dear and sacred than yours; for homes and a land not more worthy of resolute and unconquerable men than yours; and for interests of far less magnitude than you have now at stake, have not hesitated to melt and mould into cannon the precious bells surmounting their houses of God, which had called generations to prayer. The priesthood have ever sanctioned and consecrated the conversion, in the hour of their nation's need, as one holy and acceptable in the sight of God. We want cannon as greatly as any people who ever, as history tells you, melted their churchbells to supply them; and I, your general, entrusted with the command of the army embodied of your sons, your kinsmen and your neighbors, do now call o