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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 15 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 12 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 11 11 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 9 9 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 6 6 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 6 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 6 6 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 5 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1: prelminary narrative. You can also browse the collection for March 8th, 1862 AD or search for March 8th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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. 51, 110. They were stern-wheel steamers, carrying iron plating from one-half to three-quarters inch thick, covering them to a height of eleven feet, making them proof against musketry and light field artillery; they could carry, if needful, two hundred men, and had six or eight twenty-four-pound brass howitzers; their draught ranged from eighteen inches to three feet, and they were of the greatest use for raids and skirmishing, as subsidiary to larger vessels. In the naval battle of March 8, 1862, in which for the first and last time the comparative strength of wooden and iron ships was tested, a prominent and most honorable, though most disastrous, part was taken by Massachusetts officers. The Roanoke, a fifty-gun steamer, whose machinery was, however, in a disabled condition, was commanded by Capt. John Marston, a Massachusetts man, and the Cumberland, a sloop of war of twenty-four guns, in the absence of the captain by Lieut. George W. Morris, aided by Lieut. (now admiral) Th