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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 11 11 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 8 8 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 7 7 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 13, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 4 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 3 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 3 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 3 3 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for March 12th, 1862 AD or search for March 12th, 1862 AD in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 12: fight between the Merrimac and Monitor, March 8, 1862. (search)
derate gun-boats did head towards his ship, and realizing his helpless condition he made every preparation to destroy the Minnesota, determined that she should not fall into the hands of the enemy. Capt. Van Brunt goes on to say: A short time after the Merrimac and her consorts had changed their course, and were heading for Craney Island. In writing history it is no more than fair that both sides should have a hearing. Lieut. Greene, in his report to the Secretary of the Navy, dated March 12, 1862. says: At 8 A. M. perceived the Merrimac underway and standing towards the Minnesota; hove up anchor and went to quarters At 8:45 A. M. we opened fire on the Merrimac, and continued the action until 11:30 A. M., when Capt. Worden was injured. Capt. Worden then sent for me to take charge of the vessel. We continued the action until 12:15 P. M., when the Merrimac retreated to Sewell's Point, and we went to the Minnesota and lay by her. Lieut. Joseph B. Smith. ´╝łActing commande