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Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 45 45 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 2 18 18 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 12 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 4. (ed. Frank Moore) 9 9 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Massachusetts in the Army and Navy during the war of 1861-1865, vol. 1, Mass. officers and men who died. 8 8 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 5 5 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 4 4 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 17, 1862., [Electronic resource] 3 3 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Name Index of Commands 2 2 Browse Search
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2 2 2 Browse Search
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Europe, and the Northern States, every thing civil and military, and all that belonged to God's Church upon earthdying as he had lived, true to Virginia, true to the South, true to the Church, and true to the Lord his God. Saturday night, March 15, 1862. Spent to-day at the hospital. Heard of the shelling of Newbern, N. C., and of its fall. My heart sickens at every acquisition of the Federals. No further news from Arkansas. Yesterday evening L went to see the body of our dear Bishop;s morning I was at the funeral, at St. Paul's Church; the service was read by the Rev. J. P. McGuire and Rev. C. J. Gibson. Bishop Johns made a most solemn address. The procession, long and sad, then wended its way to Hollywood Cemetery. March 15th, 1862. Our army has fallen back to the Rappahannock, thus giving up the splendid Valley and Piedmont country to the enemy. This, I suppose, is right, but it almost breaks our hearts to think of it. Winchester was occupied last Wednesday! Lord
Varina Davis, Jefferson Davis: Ex-President of the Confederate States of America, A Memoir by his Wife, Volume 2, Chapter 19: effort to effect exchange of prisoners-evacuation of Manassas-visit to Fredericksburg. (search)
maintain your position and resume first policy when the roads will permit. The first policy was to carry the war beyond our own border. On March 15th the President received notice that the army was in retreat, and replied: Richmond, Va., March 15, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Headquarters Army of the Potomac. General: I have received your letter of the 13th instant, giving the first official account I have received of the retrograde movement of your army. Your letter would lead me ntingent upon reverses in the West and Southeast. The immediate necessity for such a movement is not anticipated. Very respectfully yours, Jefferson Davis. On the same day the President sent the following telegram: Richmond, Va., March 15, 1862. General J. E. Johnston, Culpepper Court-House, Va. Your letter of the 13th received this day, being the first information of your retrograde movement. I have no report of your reconnaissance, and can suggest nothing as to the position yo
&c., which I shall distribute to the men of my command here who need them. There are no indications of an advance on the part of the enemy. Their force is about 65,000. Their advance (a regiment of cavalry) is about 8 miles this side of Nashville, on the Murfreesborough pike. A sergeant among the prisoners, who seems to be an intelligent man, can give you some interesting details. I shall report to you in person on Tuesday. Colonel Wood desires me to say he will return this evening or to-morrow. John H. Morgan, Captain, Commanding Post. Major-General Hardee, Commanding First Division, Shelbyille, Tenn. [Indorsement.] Huntsville, Ala., March 15, 1862. Respectfully forwarded. The within gives accounts of another gallant act performed by this valuable officer. The Government ought at once to make some recognition of his services. I respectfully, but urgently, recommend that he be appointed a colonel in the Confederate service. W. J. Hardee, Major-General.
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), March 9-14, 1862.-expedition toward Pardy and operations about Crump's Landing, Tenn. (search)
round me. I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant Braxton Bragg, Major-General, &c. Col. Thomas Jordan, Assistant Adjutant-General, Jackson, Tenn. Hdqrs. Second Grand Div. Army of the Mississippi, Bethel, Tenn., March 15, 1862-11 a. m. Colonel: Dispatches for General Ruggles from General Gladden, now at Purdy, have just reached here. They represent the enemy to have re-embarked, and all indications point to a demonstration at some point higher up the river. Fforce pursues me I shall be powerless to cope with the enemy and have no transportation. I am, general, your obedient servant, A. H. Gladden, Brigadier-General, Commanding First Brigade. Brigadier-General Ruggles. Purdy, Tenn., March 15, 1862. General: I wrote to you last evening. Since then I have received the information contained in the inclosed reports. I am of the opinion that the enemy has entirely retired from this side of the river, and will make a demonstration highe
from you to report at headquarters with my command at the earliest possible moment. I accordingly took up the line of march for this place on the 20th instant, and arrived here on the 23d instant without the loss of a single man. Your obedient servant, Jas. P. T. Carter Colonel Second Bast Tennessee Volunteers. Acting Brigadier-General Carter, Comdg. Twelfth Brigade. No. 2.-report of Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, C. S. Army. headquarters District of Tennessee, Knoxville, March 15, 1862. General: I have the honor to report that the enemy, having passed the Cumberland Mountains, yesterday surprised and captured, without the fire of a gun, I believe, the larger number of two companies of the First East Tennessee Cavalry near Jacksborough. Their force consisted of a regiment of infantry. Couriers who arrived last night bring the intelligence that they are moving in this direction. I have ordered forward to Clinton two Alabama regiments, the Third Regiment Tennesse
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), March 14-17, 1862.-expedition from Savannah, Tenn., to Yellow Creek, Miss., and occupation of Pittsburg Landing, Tenn. (search)
burg Landing and there await our return. My belief is that the enemy's force under Cheatham will, after we pass Pittsburg, fall back on Corinth. Yet, if the force at Corinth be already large, Cheatham may remain at or near Pittsburg Landing and embarrass our return. I have the honor to be, your obedient servant, W. T. Sherman, Brigadier-General, Commanding Division. Captain McMichael, Assistant Adjutant-General. Hdqrs. First Division, Expeditionary Corps, Steamer Continental, March 15, 1862. Sir: I have the honor to report that in obedience to the order of the major-general commanding, received at 10 a. m. on the 14th instant, I started from Savannah at 12 m. with my division, embarked in nineteen steamboats, escorted by the gunboat Tyler, Commander Gwin. We proceeded steadily up the river to the mouth of Yellow Creek, reaching that point at Tyler's Landing at 7 p. m. I ordered the immediate debarkation .of the cavalry, consisting of six companies of the Fifth Ohio, und
. Crittenden, Major-General. Courtland, March 15, 1862. Col. W. W. MacKALLall: The creek at th C. Hindman Brigadier-General. Decatur, March 15, 1862. The President: General Beauregard requArmy. Brigade headquarters, Iuka, Miss., March 15, 1862. Capt. Roy Mason Hooe, Assistant Adjutant-v., Army of the Mississippi, Bethel Tenn., March 15, 1862--10.30 a. m. General Daniel Ruggles, Corinaxton Bragg, Major-General, Commanding. March 15, 1862. Major-General Bragg: General Gladden ron, Second Grand Division, Corinth, Miss., March 15, 1862. [General Bragg?]: I have the honor to , for your information: Iuka, Miss., March 15, 1862. I give you the following as the substaall suspend. G. T. Beauregard. Corinth [March 15, 1862]. General Beauregard, Jackson, Tenn.: Mrmy. Brigade headquarters, Iuka , Miss., March 15, 1862. Col. R. F. Looney, Eastport, Miss.: Cossistant Adjutant-General. Richmond, Va. March 15, 1862. Maj. Gen. E. Kirby Smith, Commanding, &c.[2 more...]
oth-bore 24 and 32-pounders, and a few better guns, Lovell and his naval compatricts, after blocking up most of the water approaches to New Orleans from, the Gulf with strongly-braced pile, green live-oaks, and other obstructions, and calling Feb. 25, 1862. on the Governor of Louisiana for 10,000 militia-receiving for answer that there were but 6,000, of whom half lad just been sent to Tennessee, upon the requisition of Gen. Beauregard--and placing his department under martial law, March 15, 1862. turned their attention almost entirely to the lower Mississippi. It was high time. A great raft, or boom, composed of cypress-trees 40 feet long and 4 to 5 feet through, standing 3 feet apart, and fastened to two great 2 1/2-inch chain-cables, had been stretched across the river jut under the guns of Forts Jackson and St. Philip, and made fast to large trees, immense anchors, timbers, &c., imbedded as firmly as possible; but the annual flood in the Mississippi, which commences early
and courage. The regiment has taken in this engagement over one hundred and fifty prisoners, among them one acting brigadier-general, one colonel, one major, one chaplain, three captains, and two lieutenants. They have also captured one stand of colors, two hundred and thirty stand of arms, and sixty horses. Very respectfully yours, Chas. Knobelsdorff, Colonel Commanding. Sigel's address to his soldiers. headquarters First and Second divisions, Camp Pea Ridge, Arkansas, March 15, 1862. To the Officers and Soldiers of the First and Second Divisions: After so many hardships and sufferings of this war in the West, a great and decisive victory has, for the first time, been attained, and the army of the enemy overwhelmed and perfectly routed. The rebellious flag of the confederate States lies in the dust, and the same men who had organized armed rebellion at Camp Jackson, Maysville and Fayetteville — who have fought against us at Boonville, Carthage and Wilson's Creek,
nt servant, John Pope, Brigadier-General Commanding. Major-General J. P. McCown, Commanding C. S.A., etc. Col. J. Kirby Smith's report. headquarters Second brigade, First division, army of the Mississippi, camp near New-Madrid, Mo., March 15, 1862. General: In compliance with your instructions, I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Second brigade of your division, under my command, in the action of the day before yesterday, (thirteenth instant.) n from any officer or soldier of these companies during the thirty-six hours of unremitted exposure and exertion. Col. John Groesbeck's report. headquarters First brigade, First division, District of the Mississippi. New-Madrid, Mo., March 15, 1862. Captain: I have the honor to report to the General commanding the First division the part taken in the late action before New-Madrid by the brigade under my command, consisting of the Twenty-seventh and Thirty-ninth regiments Ohio infantr
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